social history

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social history

A summary of life-style practices–eg, diet, exercise, sexual orientation and level of sexual activity, occupation, and habits–eg, smoking, abuse of alcohol or other substance, which may have a direct or indirect effect on a person's health. See Psychiatric history. Cf Family history.
References in periodicals archive ?
De la Pena also nicely extends the kinds of gender analysis found in other recent social histories of the late nineteenth-century U.S.
Currents and Analyses Leading to New Social Histories of Death
More in-depth (and bridging) scholarship is needed to merge the latest social histories of sexual regulation with an older, more disparate literature on death.
(76) And with the exceptions of Ernst and Sadowsky, scholars have ignored the detailed investigations into patients' backgrounds and the medical regimens of specific institutions that marked patients' experiences of confinement--methods that characterize the best social histories of psychiatry in Europe and the United States.
In fact, the two stand at opposite poles in style and context: McConnell's book is a historical version of the popular true crime genre, while Cohen's monograph is among the most thoroughly contextualized social histories recently published.
Killing Time incorporates many themes familiar to social histories of the industrialization process into an unusually broad, inclusive and readable regional study of leisure.
When attached to something to which common sense attributes a kind of ahistorical permanence, these terms are telltale signs of a work of "new cultural history," as surely as the subtitle "class and community" was of a new social history study a generation ago.(1) While new social histories showed how classes and communities came into being as the result of large-scale sociological processes and came to consciousness of their ability to affect these processes, "birth" studies generally eschew such narratives in favor of the complicated creation and negotiation of identities and conceptual delineations as exercises of power by both social authorities and those whom they seek to classify.