social contract

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social contract

Medical practice The implied understanding between physician and Pt that the former provides the best possible care in a truthful and timely fashion, in exchange for the latter's trust. See Doctor-patient relationship.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Toward that end, he presents in chapter Two games like prisoner's dilemma, chicken, or stag-hunt to discuss one-shot games and repeated games, equilibrium concepts and configurations, and what it all means for social contract issues.
That is why abiding by civil rule is part of a social contract, and is conditional upon "the protection not only of the person but also of private property".
The second priority for societies is to include elements in renewed social contracts that facilitate the provision of global public goods and prevent "beggar-thy-neighbour" policies, which produce short-term domestic benefits by harming others, and invite retaliation.
A progressive, trusted and resilient social contract, a tool of good governance, acts today as an actionable step toward revitalizing mandates of conflict prevention and sustainable peace.
States supplying social contracts also take p(r) as given, as they have no market power.
The Social Contract in America: From the Revolution to the Present Age.
Rousseau worried about the effects on the individual to live within a system based on social contracts; that as some have amassed great wealth, most others have become limited by the social contracts into a subservient role.
These are stockholder theory, stakeholder theory, and social contract theory.
Less politely, cyberspace looks a lot like Hobbes's quasi-mythical construct, the state of nature, where the inhabitants have "no common Power to feare" and where there is "no government at all." Of course, law and an ordered society will emerge from out of the state of nature - or at least so Hobbes (and Locke, and most of the other Enlightenment philosophers) believed - by means of a "social contract" voluntarily entered into by the inhabitants.
Certain rules make up the NCAA's social contract regarding player compensation (room, board and tuition), player eligibility, player recruitment, receipts from television rights, and other rules.
Whatever the case, a specific mental mechanism keeps tabs on social contracts and stays alert for cheats, Cosmides contends.