social contract

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social contract

Medical practice The implied understanding between physician and Pt that the former provides the best possible care in a truthful and timely fashion, in exchange for the latter's trust. See Doctor-patient relationship.
References in periodicals archive ?
States supplying social contracts also take p(r) as given, as they have no market power.
There is an international competitive market for social contracts in which states and citizens match with one another.
The social contract has been the dominant ideological principle in America since the Revolution, but most studies have only explored the social contract through the lens of the American Revolution or in comparison to the European models of the social contract.
Rousseau worried about the effects on the individual to live within a system based on social contracts; that as some have amassed great wealth, most others have become limited by the social contracts into a subservient role.
Stockholder theory and stakeholder theory do not talk about the society; according to the social contract theory, agents are responsible for taking care of the needs of a society without thinking about corporate or other complex business arrangements.
Whether or not you call it a new social contract, restructuring and downsizing have changed the relationship between employers and employees.
There has always been a strong fictional element to using this notion of a social contract as a rationale for a sovereign's legitimacy.
Between 1980 and the present, many institutions of higher learning have entered into such voluntary social contracts (cartels) in order to reap monetary benefits (from co-operation) that support both athletics and academics[1].
Whatever the case, a specific mental mechanism keeps tabs on social contracts and stays alert for cheats, Cosmides contends.
Finally, and again unlike social contracts elsewhere (although identical to Trudeau's "6 & 5" program in 1982), Rae's Social Contract was particularly inequitous in singling out public sector workers alone.
Instead of voluntary surrender by all, of their rights and liberties into the hands of a Leviathan, Binmore visualizes the social contract as an "implicit self-policing agreement between members of society to coordinate on a particular equilibrium in the game of life" [p.
Terror by consent; the modern state and the breach of the social contract.