social contract

(redirected from Social contract theory)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

social contract

Medical practice The implied understanding between physician and Pt that the former provides the best possible care in a truthful and timely fashion, in exchange for the latter's trust. See Doctor-patient relationship.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
What we need to see in this tradition of the liberal social contract theory is that despite these thinkers' theoretical provisions to ensure the equality of all contractual parties, their equality clause actually excludes those who would not be regarded as equal by failing to do justice to them.
This is the only applied ethics source the author has found that clearly articulates standards derived from social contract theory and Constitutional principles and can be used to make value judgments about police work.
Social contract theory is the archetypal liberal solution to the question of the justifiability of the modern state.
By social contract theory, the interacting agents must ask themselves whether existence of any personal relationships could compromise fundamental tenets of fairness or social justice.
(1985) `Contract and Justice: The Relation between Classical Contract Law and Social Contract Theory', Iowa Law Review 70(4): 769-900.
The first seeds of social contract theory can be found germinating in the fertile field of Greek philosophy before maturing to bear a particularly rich fruit in the European political theory of the seventeenth century.
The small mediating institutions necessary to nurture our natural communal identity require specific forms of corporate structure before the social contract theory can begin to analyze the authenticity of norms provided by other communities and to draw upon norms from around the world.
My more particular interest is the judiciary's use of eighteenth-century social contract theory to interpret "the people" for our time.
The latter doctrine may lead to social inaction, yet Buddhism, Mabbett firmly establishes, does contain within its teachings a form of social contract theory, whereby the true Buddhist king has responsibilities to his subjects.
Roots of the conflict model can be found in the evolutionary theory of Darwin, in the social contract theory of Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau, as well as in the works of Marx and Engels.
The general social theories of his time that he found inadequate were bound together in a cluster of associated doctrines that included the notions of natural law, natural rights, and the social contract theory of the state.