SOAP

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SOAP

 
acronym for subjective data, objective data, assessment, plan, the way the progress notes are organized in problem-oriented record keeping.

soap

 [sōp]
any compound of one or more fatty acids, or their equivalents, with an alkali. Soap is detergent and used as a cleanser.
green soap (medicinal soap) (soft soap) a soap made from vegetable oils other than coconut oil or palm kernel oil, potassium hydroxide as an alkali, and glycerin.

SOAP

(sōp),
Acronym for subjective, objective, assessment, and plan; used in problem-oriented records for organizing follow-up data, evaluation, and planning.

soap

(sōp),
The sodium or potassium salts of long-chain fatty acids (for example, sodium stearate); used as an emulsifier for cleansing purposes and as an excipient in the making of pills and suppositories.
[A.S. sape, L. sapo, G. sapōn]

SOAP

Abbreviation for:
Shipley Ophthalmic Assessment Programme
subjective, objective, assessment and plan
systolic ophthalmic artery pressure

SOAP

Patient records A standard format for physician charting of Pt exams on a problem-based Pt record; SOAP combines patient complaints and physician determinations. See Hospital chart, Medical record.
SOAP
Subjective data–supplied by the Pt or family
Objective data–physical examination and laboratory data
Assessment–a summary of significant–if any new data, physician conclusions
Plan–intended diagnostic or therapeutic action

SOAP

(sōp)
Acronym for the conceptual device used by clinicians to organize the progress notes in the problem-oriented record; S stands for subjective data provided by the patient, O for objective data gathered by health care professionals in the clinical setting, A for the assessment of the patient's condition, and P for the plan for the patient's care.

soap

(sōp)
The sodium or potassium salts of long-chain fatty acids (e.g., sodium stearate); used for cleansing purposes and as an excipient in the making of pills and suppositories.
[A.S. sape, L. sapo, G. sapōn]

SOAP

(sōp)
Acronym for subjective, objective, assessment, and plan; used in problem-oriented records for organizing follow-up data, evaluation, and planning.

soap

(sōp)
Sodium or potassium salts of long-chain fatty acids; used as an emulsifier for cleansing purposes and as an excipient in making of pills and suppositories.
[A.S. sape, L. sapo, G. sapōn]
References in periodicals archive ?
** Wash hands with a nonantimicrobial soap and water or with an antimicrobial soap and water before eating and after using a restroom.
You need hand-washing with soap and water when your hands are visibly dirty, after you've been to the bathroom or changed a diaper, and before you eat or prepare food.
So, whether you prefer a bath or a shower, you really do need both soap and water to get clean.
"Consumers may think antibacterial washes are more effective at preventing the spread of germs, but we have no scientific evidence that they are any better than plain soap and water," Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in a statement.
The children who used the hand sanitizer were at 36% lower risk of illness compared to the students who only used soap and water.
4 Clean the area around the wound with some soap and water. Pat it dry and remove the gauze.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), using alcohol-based handrubs as an addition to soap and water and gloves win add to patient safety and save more lives.
The best way to kill disease-causing germs is washing with soap and water.
Soap and water worked better because the infectious agents were simply removed from the skin and flushed down the drain.
But, if you're healthy, the super suds are duds--good old soap and water will do the trick.
Q THERE are so many different face creams on the market, but is there actually anything wrong with good old soap and water for washing your face?
The CDC guidelines state, "Perform hand hygiene with either a non-antimicrobial soap or antimicrobial soap and water when hands are visibly dirty or contaminated with blood or other potentially infectious material.