snow

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car·bon di·ox·ide snow

solid carbon dioxide used in the treatment of warts, lupus, nevi, and other skin affections, and as a refrigerant.
Synonym(s): dry ice
Drug slang A popular street term for any pulverised whitish substance of abuse which can be snorted, classically cocaine, but also heroin, amphetamine, oxycodone, etc.
Vox populi Cold crystallised white precipitation

snow

Drug slang A street term for a pulverized substance of abuse which can be snorted, classically, cocaine, but also heroin, amphetamine, oxycodone, etc
References in periodicals archive ?
Zhang, "Snow depth and snow water equivalent estimation from AMSR-E data based on a priori snow characteristics in Xinjiang, China," Remote Sensing of Environment, vol.
Peek (1997) found moose tolerant of snow depths up to 80 cm, and Coady (1974) identified 90 cm as a critical depth when adults have restricted movement and access to forage.
Winter temperatures did not correlate well with winter precipitation (r = -0.14) but were negatively correlated with snow depth (r = -0.67).
Environmental variables included slope, wind speed, exposure, and snow depth. Forage variables included Creeping Juniper, Whitemargin Phlox (Phlox albomarginata), Curly Sedge (Carex rupestris), and Prairie Sagewort (Artemesia frigida) ([x.sub.10.sup.2] = 75.07, P < 0.0001).
In addition to snow depth, other environmental factors that potentially influence ice algae biomass were investigated.
As seen, just by using the average wind shelter slope correlation with wind shelter index method without using the field measurements of snow depth or wind speed, it is possible to determine the effective distance of the study area.
Application for snow depth sensing is demonstrated in Figure 2, where [h.sub.G] is the antenna height above ground without snow cover.
8 presents, during the whole four flight missions the air temperature as well as snow depth had their seasonal trends and there was no abnormal event like sudden increase in air temperature or even unusual decrease in air temperature time series which might be resulted in the unusual changes on snow-covered surface and thus led to incorrect DEM generating and eventually followed by unreasonable conclusions based on it.
Between 1.0 and 4.5 hours after creating the trails, we measured the width and depth of each trail, as well as snow depth and penetrometer sink depth on the trail and in undisturbed snow 5 m away.
This article addresses this problem by exploiting variation in winter snow depth across states as an exogenous source of variation to social capital formation.
In the big woods, deer seek the ameliorating effects of dense softwood cover, which breaks the wind and reduces snow depth.
This variation appeared to be correlated with snow depth, which was lower in 2010 compared to 2009.