snake

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snake

 [snāk]
any of many limbless reptiles; numerous species have venomous bites. See also snakebite.
coral snake any of various venomous pit vipers of the genera Micrurus and Micruroides; called also harlequin snake.
harlequin snake coral snake.

snake

(snāk),
An elongated, limbless, scaly reptile of the suborder Ophidia.

snake

(snāk)
n.
Any of numerous scaly, legless, sometimes venomous squamate reptiles of the suborder Serpentes (or Ophidia), having a long, tapering, cylindrical body and flexible jaws.

snake

Trivial name for limbless members of suborder Ophidia, of medical interest, primarily because snakes have poisonous venom containing hemotoxins and/or neurotoxins; venomous North American snakes belong to either the viper family Crotilidae–rattlesnake, copperhead, water moccasin, or to Elapidae, coral snakes, related to cobras and kraits–India, Southeast Asia, and mambas, brown, black, tiger snakes of Australia; others–eg, constrictors encircle prey and asphyxiate; pet snakes are associated with infections: Aeromonas hydrophila, Edwardsiella tarda, E coli, mesocestoidiasis, Morganella morganii, Mycobacterium ulcerans, Ophionyssus natricis infestation, pentastosomiasis, Proteus vulgaris, Providencia spp, Q fever, salmonellosis, sparganosis. See Sea snake Vox populi A derogatory term for a ne'er-do-well–eg, lawyer, ex-spouse, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"French couturier Pierre Balmain lived here in the Thirties and his pink Art Deco Riad has been converted into one of the city's top fusion restaurants, Dar Moha," said the paper adding that "the Majorelle Gardens, which fashion designer Yves St Laurent bought in the Eighties, are full of vibrant colours." The Daily Mail underlined that Marrakech boasts several fascinating places such as El Badi Palace, once the glittering centerpiece of the Saadian dynasty in the 16th Century and the mythical Djemaa El Fna Square square where the throbbing sound of drumming competed with musicians, storytellers and snake-charmers. Leaving Behind the bustle of Marrakech, the author of the article suggests a retreat in the High Atlas mountains.
For as the sun goes down on Djemaa El Fna, out come the snake-charmers, fire-eaters, jugglers and musicians.
The market lies in the heart of Marrakesh, bordering the central square where snake-charmers, monkey-trainers, story-tellers, numerologists and acrobats are among the extraordinary sights.