nootropic

(redirected from Smart Drugs)
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no·o·trop·ic

(nō-ō-trop'ik),
Denotes an agent having an effect on memory.

nootropic

[nō·ətrop′ik]
a chemical designed to increase brain metabolism.

nootropic

adjective Referring to a nootropic agent.
 
noun Any agent—drug, functional food, nutraceutical or nutritional supplement—which is thought to improve mental function, including attention, cognition, concentration, memory or motivation, allegedly by increasing the availability of neurotransmitters, enzymes or hormones, and by increasing O2 delivery or stimulating neural activity.

There is little clinical evidence that most agents advertised as nootropics actually work as advertised.

nootropic

(nō″ă-trŏp′ĭk) [Gr. nous, mind + tropikos, turning, affecting]
Capable of improving or preserving memory, of potentiating learning, or of preventing cognitive decline or dementia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The turn towards repressive control of the body as a means of profit and assault on critical forms of education is exemplified by the rise of Smart Drugs.
MHRA Senior Policy Manager Lynda Scammell said: You may be offered smart drugs or cognitive enhancers at university some of them may be potent medicines which should only be prescribed by a doctor.
This class of smart drugs includes Ginseng, Kava Kava, Passion Flower, St.
It seems the questions being answered will range from the slightly facetious (do smart drugs make you clever?
In 1996, I had bought the Smart Drugs books and then started a subscription to Smart Drugs News, written by Steve Fowkes.
We know that smart drugs like Cetuximab are not always effective in the cancer cells they're supposed to target because there are no positive predictive markers for selecting the patients who will benefit from treatment with EGFR-targeted therapies, including EGFR itself," said lead author Nita Maihle, professor in the Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences and of Pathology at Yale School of Medicine.
In a close-run final they successfully argued against the use of smart drugs.
While he said statins could work to boost the immune system, he said smart drugs could potentially be created which worked in a much more targeted way.
Those who claim that use of smart drugs constitutes cheating, then, are best understood as claiming that such drugs enable users to gain an unfair advantage, and that therefore the rules ought to be changed so as to prohibit them.
Nathan in his new book "The Cancer Treatment Revolution: How Smart Drugs and Other New Therapies Are Renewing Our Hope.
A: I wish I had known about smart drugs when I went through medical school.
For his probe on smart drugs, he wore EIGHT different outfits.