Landslide

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A downward slope movement of a potentially lethal mixture of water, rocks, and mud, triggered by earthquakes, volcanoes, or weather events
References in periodicals archive ?
As a slope failure is referred as the alteration of a mass of rock, earth or debris down a slope (Cruden, 1991), therefore, the main distinguishing characteristic of false positives values caused by any other feature rather than landslide from the true positives was their presence on plane areas.
Clearly, despite the existence of previous slope failure records, deep professional experience and an extensive geotechnical monitoring setup--including slope stability radar units, along with extensometers, a prism network and microseismic equipment--the mine's geotechnical team was caught off guard by the scope and nature of the slide.
Figure 16 shows the numerical simulation results of the slope failure conditions for the four mining scenarios.
Factors affecting slope instabilities such as ground conditions, physical and geomorphological processes, and human activities cannot be determined on a continuous basis, making it challenging to predict the time of slope failure accurately [2].
Itoh, "Back analyses of rainfall-induced slope failure in Northland Allochthon formation," Landslides, vol.
Keywords: Slope Failure, Liquid Limit, Dry Density, Shear Strength, Internal Friction Angle
This was enlarged by a subsequent slope failure in 2008, forming what is now a salient scar on the south side of the Pond (Fig.
Slope Failure Analysis: There are several methods available to perform slope failure analysis considering specific field conditions (Bishop, 1955; Janbu, 1955; and Fredlend, 1984).
Rainfall-Induced Soil Slope Failure: Stability Analysis and Probabilistic Assessment
SMPC also is required to "submit a detailed assessment on the cause of slope failure."
Li, "Three-dimensional slope failure analysis by the strength reduction and limit equilibrium methods," Computers and Geotechnics, vol.
The system also addresses issues of soil erosion, slope failure, and lack of vegetative growth, while potentially saving thousands of dollars per acre each year years versus traditional Subtitle D.