cranial sutures

(redirected from Skull suture)

cra·ni·al su·tures

[TA]
the sutures between the bones of the skull.
Synonym(s): suturae cranii [TA]

cranial sutures

the interlocking lines of fusion (fibrous joints) of the bones forming the skull. The lines gradually become less prominent as a person matures. Also called suturae cranii.

cra·ni·al su·tures

(krā'nē-ăl sū'chŭrz) [TA]
The sutures between the bones of the skull.

cra·ni·al su·tures

(krā'nē-ăl sū'chŭrz) [TA]
Sutures between the bones of the cranium.
References in periodicals archive ?
2012) observed a pattern in terrestrial artiodactyls, where small species show a very limited amount of skull suture fusion, hypothesizing that it could be related to the thickness of the skull bones, based on the functional observations of Moazen et al.
The 3-D technology is also good for evaluation of skull suture closure, measurement of the chin for micrognathia, assessment of the ocular orbits, and visualization of facial anatomy when the fetus is not in a good position for viewing the profile in a 2-D plane.
We considered the specimen a subadult and not a juvenile because of a complete outbreak of teeth and ossified skull sutures (Fig.
Obliteration of skull sutures in late age practically when all the teeth have erupted and epiphysis have fused, i.
IN A first of its kind operation, a team of doctors at AIIMS have successfully operated upon twin babies -- with rare AB - ve blood group -- who were suffering from craniosynostosis, a condition of early fusion of the skull sutures ( specialised joints) leading to restriction in brain growth and cosmetic disfiguring.
CMF of the skull is believed to most often arise from the synostosis at the base of the skull or from skull sutures.
If skull sutures are mobile, growth will be symmetrical side to side and back to front.
The pattern of skull sutures in Acanthostega doesn't match the one found in Polypterus, a modern fish that, like most fish today, captures its prey by slurping it in (SN: 4/24/04, p.
Because most of the morphological systematic or taxonomic studies of pocket gophers are based on randomly trapped, post mortem specimens, Thaeler (1967) and Hoffmeister (1969) proposed the degree of fusion of five and two skull sutures, respectively, as criteria for age determination in pocket gophers.
Common craniofacial birth defects include orofacial clefts (cleft lip, cleft palate, or both), craniosynostosis (when the skull sutures join together prematurely), and anotia/microtia (when the ear is missing or malformed).
No single skull shape is diagnostic of craniofacial dysostosis, because the eventual shape of the head depends on the sequence in which the skull sutures fused.
Other common craniofacial birth defects include craniosynostosis (when the skull sutures fuse prematurely) and microtia/anotia (when an infant's ear is small and poorly formed or missing).