dead space

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dead space

 
1. a space remaining in the tissues as a result of failure of proper closure of surgical or other wounds, permitting the accumulation of blood or serum.
2. the portions of the respiratory tract that are ventilated but not perfused by pulmonary circulation.
alveolar dead space the difference between anatomical dead space and physiologic dead space, representing the space in alveoli occupied by air that does not participate in oxygen–carbon dioxide exchange (alveolar ventilation). It varies in different parts of the lungs and under different conditions.
anatomical dead space the airways of the mouth, nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles.
equipment dead space the volume of equipment that results in rebreathing of gases.
physiologic dead space the sum of the anatomic and alveolar dead spaces; its volume (VD) is determined by measuring the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in a sample of exhaled gas (PECO2) and in the arterial blood (PaCO2) and (with tidal volume of VT) using the formula VD/VT = (PaCO2−PECO2)/PaCO2.

dead space

1. a cavity, potential or real, remaining after the closure of a wound that is not obliterated by the operative technique;
2.
Physiology All non-air exchanging spaces of the upper respiratory tract; there are ± 2.0 ml of ‘dead space’/kg body weight—i.e., a 70-kg person has 140–150 ml of dead space in the oronasopharynx, bronchi, and bronchioles
Therapeutics That part of a syringe’s tip and needle that contains medication that cannot be administered; dead space is very important in insulin therapy, and for drugs in which the syringe has < 0.5 mL capacity

dead space

Clinical therapeutics That part of a syringe's tip and needle that contains medication that can't be administered; DS is very important in insulin therapy, and for medications where the syringe has < 0.5 mL capacity

dead space

(ded spās)
A cavity, potential or real, remaining after the closure of a wound that is not obliterated by the operative technique.
See: anatomic dead space, physiologic dead space

dead space

the air in trachea, bronchi and bronchioles that does not take part in gaseous exchange. Of each breath of 500 cm3, only about half of the air reaches the alveoli.

dead space

(ded spās)
A cavity, potential or real, remaining after the closure of a wound that is not obliterated by the operative technique.