Six Elements Test

Six Elements Test

A test that assesses the ability of people to perform several tasks at the same time. The test consists of three projects, each consisting of two parts. Subjects are asked to try to complete all six parts within ten minutes. However, even though this is likely to prove impossible in the allotted time, subjects must complete at least one part of each project, and they may not complete the second part of any project immediately after completing the first. The test assesses the ability of subjects to multitask, to plan, to use time effectively, and to solve problems. A refined and simplified version of the test, called the Modified Six Elements Test, is used to gauge cognitive deficits in patients with brain injury, attention deficit disorder, and other neurological and psychiatric diseases.
References in periodicals archive ?
A range of standardised neuropsychological measures (Biber Cognitive Estimation Test [29], Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status [37], verbal fluency measures [38], Modified Six Elements Test [39], and Trail-Making Test [40]) were used to measure an array of current cognitive functioning at induction to the study.
Modified Six Elements Test. The Modified Six Elements Test (MSET) [39] consists of three tasks (simple arithmetic, written picture naming, and dictation), each of which consists of two parts (subtasks A and B).
BCET was associated most strongly with the Modified Six Elements Test (r = .42, p = 0.001), phonemic fluency (r = .26, p = 0.001), TMT B (r = -.29, p = 0.001), and the TMT difference score (r = -.23, p = 0.001) but not with the TMT ratio score (r = -.07).
Shallice, "Modified six elements test," in Behavioral Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome, B.
Fasotti, "Validity of an adapted scoring method for a Modified Six Elements Test in individuals with brain injury," Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, vol.