sepsis syndrome

(redirected from Site of infection)

sepsis syndrome

clinical evidence of acute infection with hyperthermia or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnea and evidence of inadequate organ function or perfusion manifested by at least one of the following: altered mental status, hypoxemia, acidosis, oliguria, or disseminated intravascular coagulation.

sepsis syndrome

clinical evidence of acute infection with hyperthermia or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnea and evidence of inadequate organ function or perfusion manifested by at least one of the following: altered mental status, hypoxemia, acidosis, oliguria, or disseminated intravascular coagulation.

sepsis syndrome

A constellation of signs, Sx, and systemic responses caused by a wide range of microorganisms that may eventuate into septic shock; SS is a systemic response to infection
Sepsis syndrome, defining parameters  
• Temperature Hypothermia < 35ºC–96ºF or hyperthermia > 39ºC–101ºF
• Tachycardia > 90 beats/minute
• Tachypnea > 20 breaths/minute
• Site of infection Clinically evident focus of infection or positive blood cultures
• Organ dysfunction 1+ end organs with either dysfunction or inadequate perfusion or cerebral dysfunction
• Metabolic derangement Hypoxia–PaO2 < 75 mm Hg, ↑ plasma lactate/unexplained metabolic acidosis
• Fluid imbalance Oliguria–< 30 mL/hr
• WBC counts < 2.0 x 109/L; > 12.0 x 109/L–US: < 2000/mm3; > 12 000/mm3
Note: The confusing semantics of the terms sepsis, sepsis/septic syndrome, and septic shock are unlikely to be resolved in the forseeable future; the terms sepsis and septic syndrome are essentially interchangeable and would in part overlap with septicemia–the early components of a pernicious infectious cascade that has spilled into the circulation; the term septic shock is used when the process becomes virtually irreversible.

sep·sis syn·drome

(sep'sis sin'drōm)
Clinical evidence of acute infection with hyperthermia or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnea, and evidence of inadequate organ function or perfusion manifested by at least one of the following: altered mental status, hypoxemia, acidosis, oliguria, or disseminated intravascular coagulation.

sep·sis syn·drome

(sep'sis sin'drōm)
Clinical evidence of acute infection with hyperthermia or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnea, and evidence of inadequate organ function.
References in periodicals archive ?
By delivering vancomycin directly to the lungs, higher vancomycin concentrations are achieved at the site of infection, which is expected to lead to improved clinical efficacy.
Blood-neutrophils migrate to the site of infection where they, in concert with the complement system, engulf and kill bacteria in a process called phagocytosis.
Then a spectrum of infectious diseases are described, organized by site of infection, with special discussion of childhood infections, history-taking and monitoring.
This can usually be administered directly to the site of infection in a spray, drops or a cream.
coli molecules are injected, however, actin polymers rush to the site infection and help bacterial molecules both move within the cell and establish an internal site of infection.
Antibiotic penetration to the site of infection is a prerequisite for the effective treatment of pneumonia and this study clearly establishes that torezolid phosphate at the current 200 mg once-daily therapeutic dose is able to achieve a target exposure of drug expected to effectively treat lung infections," said Dr.
A radiotracer uptake at the site of infection higher than background is observed in patients with proven infection which demonstrates the role of [sup.
A spectrum of clinical disease follows: when the infection produces multiple systemic symptoms, such as fever and increased respiratory or heart rate, the syndrome is referred to as sepsis; if the systemic response to infection progresses and causes evidence of organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, patients are classified as having severe sepsis; septic shock is defined as severe organ dysfunction with hypotension or hypoperfusion not responsive to initial fluid resuscitation (Table I).
Part I gives a general introduction to epidemiology and presents practical approaches for using patient risk factors, exposures, and site of infection to direct diagnostic evaluations.
There have been particular problems where IV lines in the backs of hands have been identified as a site of infection and we are following this up with the hospital.
Since the dose deposited in the nose is largely below the minimal dose required by intranasal inoculation, this would indicate that the preferred site of infection initiation during aerosol inoculation is the lower respiratory tract.
In AOMT we can administer topical antibiotics and steroids directly to the site of infection without significant systemic exposure.

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