cladistics

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Related to Sister taxa: Artificial classification, Sister taxon

cladistics

(klə-dĭs′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
A system of classification based on the presumed phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary history of groups of organisms.

cla·dis′tic, cla·dis′ti·cal adj.
cla·dis′ti·cal·ly adv.

cladistics

an approach to CLASSIFICATION by which organisms are ordered and ranked entirely on a basis which reflects recent origin from a common ancestor, i.e. like a family tree. The system is concerned simply with the branching of the tree and not with the degree of difference. The latter is the concern of evolutionary taxonomists who oppose the cladistic approach.
References in periodicals archive ?
An Alternative: Comparing Temporal Gaps of Conflicting Sister Taxa Hypotheses
In the Shimodaira- Hasegawa tests, the best tree that did not have Ilyphagus octobranchus and Diplocirrus glaucus as sister taxa made them a polytomy rather than splitting them apart.
Because each of the six pairs of sister taxa are descended from the same WT individual, they can be assembled to form any of 15 possible four-taxon phylogenies.
genetic variation among sister taxa, but little interpopulation variation; i.
The strict consensus [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 8 OMITTED] shows Taxodium and Cupressus as sister taxa linked with Sciadopitys and with this subclade sharing a node with Dolmitia.
I conducted one final conservative test for rate correlations by just comparing branch lengths between each pair of terminal sister taxa (terminal contrasts).
Among the notable consistent features in the 20 trees of this study were that the two fish always occurred together as sister taxa, and the two rodents were always together.
1992) have characterized a DNA satellite unique to these two species, providing further evidence of their sister taxa status.
collybita, trochilus]) that are themselves not sister taxa [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURES 3, 4 OMITTED].
Studies of taxonomy and morphological variation in darters have revealed allopatrically distributed sister taxa for several species, suggesting that vicariant events have been a major force in the evolution of the group (Mayden 1988).
Although the evolution of body size has undoubtedly played a major role in the history of these fishes, we are interested in comparing the magnitudes of morphometric variation between sister taxa that are largely or entirely free of variation due to overall size.