chromatid

(redirected from Sister chromatid)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Sister chromatid: Sister chromatid exchange

chromatid

 [kro´mah-tid]
either of two parallel filaments joined at the centromere that make up a chromosome and that divide in cell division, each going to a different pole of the dividing cell and each becoming a chromosome of one of the two daughter cells.

chro·ma·tid

(krō'mă-tid),
Each of the two strands formed by longitudinal duplication of a chromosome that becomes visible during prophase of mitosis or meiosis; the two chromatids are joined by the still undivided centromere; after the centromere has divided at metaphase and the two chromatids have separated, each chromatid becomes a chromosome.
[G. chrōma, color, + -id (2),]

chromatid

/chro·ma·tid/ (kro´mah-tid) either of two parallel, spiral filaments joined at the centromere which make up a chromosome.

chromatid

(krō′mə-tĭd)
n.
Either of the two daughter strands of a replicated chromosome that are joined by a single centromere and separate during cell division to become individual chromosomes.

chromatid

[krō′mətid]
Etymology: Gk, chroma, color
one of the two identical, threadlike filaments of a chromosome. Chromatids are produced by the self-replication of the chromosome during interphase and are held together by a common centromere. During anaphase of mitosis and meiosis II, the chromatids separate to become daughter chromosomes.

chro·ma·tid

(krō'mă-tid)
Each of the two strands formed by longitudinal duplication of a chromosome that becomes visible during prophase of mitosis or meiosis; the two chromatids are joined by the still undivided centromere; after the centromere has divided at metaphase and the two chromatids have separated, each chromatid becomes a chromosome.
[G. chrōma, color, + -id (2),]

chromatid

One of the two duplicated copies of a chromosome produced by replication while still connected at the CENTROMERE before separation at the subsequent cell division. Each chromatid becomes a new chromosome.
Chromatidclick for a larger image
Fig. 102 Chromatid . (a) Before duplication. (b) After duplication.

chromatid

one of a pair of duplicated CHROMOSOMES produced during the ‘S’ phase of the CELL CYCLE, which are joined together at the CENTROMERE. See Fig. 102 . During nuclear division the centromere splits (in anaphase of mitosis, anaphase 2 of MEIOSIS) to produce two separate chromosomes.

chromatid

either of two parallel filaments joined at the centromere which make up a chromosome, and which divide in cell division, each going to a different pole of the dividing cell and each becoming a chromosome of one of the two daughter cells.

sister chromatid
a chromatid formed by a replicating chromosome during interphase; because they are derived from the one homolog and joined at the center they are exact copies of each other.
References in periodicals archive ?
SCE assay is a short-term test for the detection of reciprocal exchanges of DNA between two sister chromatids of a duplicating chromosome.
The alteration of sister chromatid exchange frequencies in Behcet's disease with and without HLA-B51.
Dynamic mosaicism occurs as a consequence of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) of the ring chromosome during replication, resulting in several unbalanced chromosome outcomes.
To detect toxicity of the fluoride, this novel tech-nique of micronucleus (MN) and sister chromatid ex-change (SCE) was applied in a study by some research-ers, to detect mutagenicity and potential carcinogenic-ity from fluoride in fluorosis patients who drink el-evated concentrations of fluoride in water.
For example, morphine was shown to enhance the frequency of UV-induced sister chromatid exchanges (Shafer et al.
The incidence of chromosome aberrations in boswelic acid treated groups were mostly fragments, sister chromatid exchanges and ring formation by all four treatment doses but found statistically insignificant when compared to the vehicle control group.
Chromosomal aberrations, as well as micronuclei and sister chromatid exchanges, are in fact only formed in vitro, following mitogen stimulation of quiescent T lymphocytes: thus, the time enlapsed between stimulation and fixation of primary DNA damage (normally the first DNA replication in vitro) may allow the repair of most of damage induced in vivo in circulating lymphocytes (16).
Sister-chromatid exchange (SCE): Somatic recombination and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) can result in chromatid alteration that can affect the expression of genes by the loss of heterozygocity.
Plant systems have a variety well defined genetic endpoints including alterations in ploidy, chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (Grant, 1994).
Sister chromatid exchanges and micronuclei in peripheral lymphocytes of shoe factory workers exposed to solvents.
3-fold increase in the mean number of sister chromatid exchanges (the number of crossover events in a chromosome pair), from 6.