scissors

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scis·sors

(siz'ŏrz), Avoid using the backformation scissor as a singular noun meaning 'pair of scissors'.
An instrument with two blades, moving on a pivot, that cut against each other.
Synonym(s): shears
[L. scindo, pp. scissus, to cut]
Drug slang A regional term for marijuana
Surgery An instrument with 2 opposing cutting blades

scissors

Surgery An instrument with 2 opposing cutting blades. See Dissecting scissors.

scis·sors

(siz'ŏrz)
An instrument with two blades, moving on a pivot, which cut against each other.
Synonym(s): shears.
[L. scindo, pp. scissus, to cut]
References in periodicals archive ?
Sissors (1971) argued that demographic variable substitution is potentially inaccurate, since it is based on a single variable.
The importance of reach and frequency distribution estimates has been heightened by increased usage of the concept of "effective reach and frequency" among both practitioners and academicians (Kreshel, Lancaster, and Toomey, 1985; Lancaster, Pelati, and Cho, 1991; Sissors, 1982; Turk and Katz, 1992).
Turk (1988) attributes the concept of "effective reach," or "effective frequency," to Alvin Achenbaum's (1977) notion of "effective exposure." Sissors and Bumba (1993) trace the concept back even further to Brown, Lessler, and Weilbacher (1957), suggesting that there is "a theoretical number of impressions required to convert each individual prospect into a purchaser." In 1979, Naples' book on "effective frequency" was published and became a standard work in media theory.