SIRT2

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SIRT2

A gene on chromosome 19q13 that encodes a widely expressed NAD-dependent enzyme that deacetylates Lys-40 of alpha-tubulin and is involved in controlling mitotic exit in the cell cycle, possibly by cytoskeletal regulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Feinberg, "SIRT3, a human SIR2 homologue, is an NAD-dependent deacetylase localized to mitochondria," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol.
Saito et al., "Developmental defects and p53 hyperacetylation in Sir2 homolog (SIRT1)-deficient mice," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol.
discussed his discovery of SIRT1 and the longevity-boosting properties as well as the its role in many different body tissues as well as SIR2 as a key regulator of life span in response to diet.
(16,20) Interestingly, when the rDNA repeat number reaches the wild-type level, E-pro expression is repressed by Sir2, which is a [NAD.sup.+]-dependent histone deacetylase.
Saito et al., "Developmental defects and p53 hyperacetylation in Sir2 homolog (SIRT1)deficient mice," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol.
Histone deacetylases are generally classified into four different classes, namely, HDACs 1-3 and 8, belonging to Class I and related to homologous to Rpd3, HDAC 4-7, 9-10 are Class II related to Hda1, Sirt 1-7 are Class III and are similar to Sir2 and HDAC11 belongs to Class IV.
Iezzi et al., "Sir2 regulates skeletal muscle differentiation as a potential sensor of the redox state," Molecular Cell, vol.
In non-mammalian species such as yeast and nematodes, the homologous gene of SIRT1 is Sir2, which has also been associated with anti-ageing and longevity.
The following discussion focuses on three [NAD.sup.+]-dependent enzymes: carboxyl-terminal binding protein (CtBP); silent information regulator (Sir2); and the heterodimeric Clock/ NPAS2 transcriptional regulator, whose activities may play a role in ethanol-induced injury.
The NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase Sir2 regulates life-span in various species [53].
Gorbunova notes that the SIRT6 protein is structurally related to another protein, SIR2, which has been shown to extend lifespan in multiple model organisms.
The results suggest that the Sirt1 gene promotes autophagy and further highlight the role of the protein SIRT1 (the human homologue of the yeast Silent Information Regulator 2 (Sir2) gene) as a tumor suppressor in the prostate.