SIRT2

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SIRT2

A gene on chromosome 19q13 that encodes a widely expressed NAD-dependent enzyme that deacetylates Lys-40 of alpha-tubulin and is involved in controlling mitotic exit in the cell cycle, possibly by cytoskeletal regulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
A: SIR2 is not an enzyme, but a protein gene that has been found to extend the lifespan of yeast, worms, and flies.
The silencing protein SIR2 and its homologs are NAD-dependent protein deacetylases.
Sir2 removes an acetyl group attached to a specific site (lysine at position 16 or K16) on histone H4-histones are proteins that package and organize the long strands of DNA within the nucleus and also are central regulators in turning genes on and off.
The HDACs have been classified into protein families that include classical HDACI family (HDAC 1, 2, 3 and 8), HDAC II family (HDAC 4, 5,6,7,9 and 10) and NAD+ dependent HDACs the SiR2 family.
In particular, the gene sir2 (in lower organisms) and its mammalian counterpart, sirt1, are thought to mediate many of the life extending effects of calorie restriction.
Resveratrol is one of a small number of polyphenols, plant-based antioxidants, that increases the activity of a certain enzyme called Sir2 (one of the sirtuin family of enzymes).
It is analogous to a protein in humans called Sir2 whose function is unknown.
SIRT1 is the human equivalent of Sir2, a gene identified in yeast that plays a key role in the control of lifespan, metabolism, resistance to stress and other cellular regulatory pathways.
Brenner's lab discovered a second pathway by which NR is converted to NAD+ and showed that NR can extend the lifespan of yeast cells by virtue of elevating NAD+ levels and increasing the activity of the NAD+-dependent Sir2 enzyme.
Fresh garlic extract has the potential to suppress hyphae formation with concomitant down-regulated SIR2 expression in C.
It is found in red wine, the skin of young unripe red grapes, grape seeds, and purple grape juice, and in smaller amounts in peanuts, the roots of the Chinese medicinal herb Polygonum cuspidatum, and a South American shrub - Senna quinquangulata - that activates a group of genes called sirtuins (silent information regulator proteins), specifically SIRT1 and Sir2 genes in human cells.
The enzyme Sir2, which removes the acetyl group, also controls the enzyme.