Browne

(redirected from Sir Thomas Browne)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Sir Thomas Browne: Thomas Fuller

Browne

(brown),
Denis John, 20th-century British surgeon. See: Denis Browne pouch, Denis Browne splint.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Keynes remains my own choice for experiencing what Kevin Killeen so well describes as the symphonic "surge-force" (xli) of the writings of Sir Thomas Browne.
STUART: I don't think I was particularly influenced by Sir Thomas Browne, but everybody that I felt like I walked hand in hand with was influenced by Sir Thomas Browne.
An examination here of the generic potentials that Sebald liberates from the English and develops for his own German works leads to an important reassessment of these old genres and texts and of those by Sir Thomas Browne in particular.
Lewis sees humanity as holding a distinctive place in Creation, and to describe this position he borrows a metaphor from Sir Thomas Browne, an author who was part of the fabric of Lewis' own scholarship.
The essay 'Sir Thomas Browne' appeared in Borges' 1925 volume Inquisiciones (Borges 1994b).
After the observation of Thales of Miletus (625-547 BC) that amber was attracting bits of fluff when rubbed, it was 2200 years later that Sir Thomas Browne (1605-1685) attributed amber's strange property to the presence of "electricity", a name he coined from the Greek name "HAEKTPON" for amber.
These are quotations from a rich variety of sources, including Aristotle, Sir Thomas Browne, Beatrix Potter, Walter de la Mare, Emily Bronte, and of course--again and again- -William Shakespeare.
Edward may have been referring primarily to her ability to draw and paint, skills we know she practised frequently from the references in the correspondence of their father, Sir Thomas Browne (for example, 'Beside limning, Bet.
Grey's detailed interpretations of Mardi and Moby-Dick demonstrate Melville's profound engagement with epistemological challenges presented by Locke and with Sir Thomas Browne's "moderate skepticism and probabilist methods" (211).
Jackson reports in Marginalia: Readers Writing in Books (Yale University Press, 2001), it was Coleridge who brought the word marginalia from Latin into English when, in 1819, he published under that name in Blackwood's Magazine his notes on Sir Thomas Browne.
While acknowledging that religion was not the sole cause of the English Civil War or of the political and socio-economic upheaval at mid-century in England, Achsah Guibbory chooses to focus on how the ritual vs anti-ritual ideologies (the Laudian or ceremonialist vs the Puritan) manifest themselves in seventeenth-century English society and in the writings of George Herbert, Robert Herrick, Sir Thomas Browne, and John Milton.