Browne

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Browne

(brown),
Denis John, 20th-century British surgeon. See: Denis Browne pouch, Denis Browne splint.
References in periodicals archive ?
RAIL: I was thinking of Sir Thomas Browne when he was writing about the urn burials--his "Hydriotapia.
An examination here of the generic potentials that Sebald liberates from the English and develops for his own German works leads to an important reassessment of these old genres and texts and of those by Sir Thomas Browne in particular.
Lewis sees humanity as holding a distinctive place in Creation, and to describe this position he borrows a metaphor from Sir Thomas Browne, an author who was part of the fabric of Lewis' own scholarship.
Elizabeth was the third of the seven daughters of Sir Thomas Browne and Dorothy Mileham.
Sir Thomas Browne Jonathan Hadary His Soul Anika Noni Rose Dame Dorothy Browne Shelley Williams Babbo Sloane Shelton Maccabbee Rod Gnapp Dr.
When Pater was writing his review of Saintsbury's Specimens of English Prose Style, his essay on Sir Thomas Browne must have been partially written, since it appeared three months later.
He begins with 'Sir', and his top author is Sir Thomas Browne with 3,851 quotations in a total of 17,400 quotations from works by men whose name was preceded by 'Sir'.
5) And Sir Thomas Browne in Pseudodoxia Epidemica,(6) calls it 'an excresence about the roots of Elder', explaining that by vulgar error it is named a jew's ear from Judas Iscariot, who was supposed to have hanged himself on an elder tree.
Later writers who most nearly recall the charm of Montaigne include, in England, Robert Burton, though his whimsicality is more erudite, Sir Thomas Browne, and Laurence Sterne, and in France, with more self-consciousness and pose, Andre Gide and Jean Cocteau.
What was so rare about him was his sense of dissident national identity: he belonged to the England of the Elizabethan philosopher/astrologer John Dee, of the 17th-century diarist and antiquarian John Evelyn and the mystic and medical man Sir Thomas Browne, and of the metaphysical poets--John Donne, George Herbert, Henry Vaughan.
When I wrote these [early] pieces, I was trying to play the sedulous ape to two Spanish baroque seventeenth-century writers, Quevedo and Saavedra Fajardo, who stood in their own stiff, arid, Spanish way for the same kind of writing as Sir Thomas Browne in "UrneBuriall.