Browne

(redirected from Sir Thomas Browne)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Sir Thomas Browne: Thomas Fuller

Browne

(brown),
Denis John, 20th-century British surgeon. See: Denis Browne pouch, Denis Browne splint.
References in periodicals archive ?
An examination here of the generic potentials that Sebald liberates from the English and develops for his own German works leads to an important reassessment of these old genres and texts and of those by Sir Thomas Browne in particular.
Lewis sees humanity as holding a distinctive place in Creation, and to describe this position he borrows a metaphor from Sir Thomas Browne, an author who was part of the fabric of Lewis' own scholarship.
Elizabeth was the third of the seven daughters of Sir Thomas Browne and Dorothy Mileham.
The word was used first, the claim runs, by Sir Thomas Browne in 1637; the implication is that without the word there was no act, or at least that the act was culturally inconceivable.
Born in 1644, Edward was the son of Sir Thomas Browne (author of Religio Medici) and had just finished his time at Trinity College, Cambridge by acquiring a medical degree.
When Pater was writing his review of Saintsbury's Specimens of English Prose Style, his essay on Sir Thomas Browne must have been partially written, since it appeared three months later.
What was so rare about him was his sense of dissident national identity: he belonged to the England of the Elizabethan philosopher/astrologer John Dee, of the 17th-century diarist and antiquarian John Evelyn and the mystic and medical man Sir Thomas Browne, and of the metaphysical poets--John Donne, George Herbert, Henry Vaughan.
We know that Osler read and reread Religio Medici, written by his hero and spiritual mentor, Sir Thomas Browne, and the book was placed in his coffin.
The chapter looks at three shorter commentaries by Sir Thomas Browne, Stephen Jay, and Lucy Hutchinson and then moves to the larger literary projects of Hugo Grotius, Samuel Pordage, and John Dryden.
The authors whom Thoreau adapts to his own purposes include Ben Jonson, Thomas Carew, Milton, Sir Thomas Browne, Izaak Walton, and Abraham Cowley.
The Works of Sir Thomas Browne (Faber & Faber, 1964), I, p.