sinophobia


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sinophobia

Morbid fear of the Chinese, and of Chinese culture.
References in periodicals archive ?
The research concluded the different levels of perception existed due to different professions of opinion leaders of Pakistan on CPEC under News Silk Road towards Security matters of Pakistan and China within the fabric of Sinophilia and Sinophobia. The opinion leaders related to security (police) in Pakistan had low positive image as compared to opinion leaders related to education, journalism and bureaucracy on security matters for CPEC under New Silk Road.
The bilateral relations between Russia and India are closer, "yet disturbingly, so too are India's ties with the U.S., which have been advanced at the obvious expense of China's security." It is the palpable Sinophobia that is pushing India to interfere in the internal affairs of China.
"Empathy and Sinophobia: Depicting Chinese Migration in Biutiful (Inarritu 2010)." Trans 6.1 (2015): 1-16.
This Sinophobia was not only an attempt to obtain financial aid from the central government but also an expression of the frustration of local people who experienced great hardship following the sudden collapse of the state economy.
"Empathy y Sinophobia: Depicting Chinese Migration in Biutiful (Inarritu, 2010)".
(24) Delgado's final chapter "Por la Patria y por la Raza" (For the Fatherland and for the Race) echoes Maloney's point by illustrating that in Mexico, too, authorities and popular leaders deployed female sexuality in shaping images of the Chinese, political and popular discourse of Sinophobia, and its explosive violence.
Steinmetz analyzes the shift in German culture from sinophilic attitudes to racist sinophobia, finding in the multiple implications of the Chinese ghost a representation of "the evolution of European discourse on China from the Middle Ages to the end of the nineteenth century." The ghost, he argues, evokes various connotations of "sexually charged difference," "Oriental despotism," "stagnation, illness, and death" (424-26).
Sinophobia and conflict between Chinese and non-Chinese has remained common in Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines in recent decades, occasionally leading to anti-Chinese violence.
(7) Indeed, see Markley, who examines the second volume's strange sinophobia (177-209).