microorganism

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Related to Single-cell organism: unicellular, Unicellular organism

microorganism

 [mi″kro-or´gah-nizm]
a microscopic organism; those of medical interest include bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Viruses are often classified as microorganisms, although they are sometimes excluded because they are not cellular and they are unable to replicate without a host cell.

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī'krō-ōr'gan-izm),
A microscopic organism (plant or animal).

microorganism

An organism detected by microscopy—e.g., viruses, bacteria, fungi and intracellular parasites (protozoans).

microorganism

 A organism detected by microscopy–eg, viruses, bacteria, fungi and intracellular parasites–protozoans; bug

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī'krō-ōr'găn-izm)
A microscopic organism (plant or animal).

microorganism

or

microbe

any microscopic organism such as a BACTERIUM, FUNGUS, PROTOZOAN, microscopicALGA or member of the ARCHAEA.

Microorganism

An organism (life form) that is too small to be seen with the naked eye.

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī'krō-ōr'găn-izm)
A microscopic organism (plant or animal).
References in periodicals archive ?
The theory holds that life began with single-cell organisms 4.5 billion years ago, then gradually evolved into more complex plants and animals.
Things go terribly wrong when a colony of single-cell organisms begin rapidly multiplying, killing most of the crew in a hideous way.
Single-cell organisms reproduce by simply dividing into halves, each half becoming a distinct individual capable of further subdivision.
* The single-cell organisms have infected 37 people in the U.S.
A report in the current issue of Nature Geoscience details the discovery by a team of Australian and British geologists of fossilized single-cell organisms believed to be 3.4 billion years old.
Bacteria are single-cell organisms that can survive independently.
Now scientist Scott Power at Genencor International in Palo Alto, Calif., claims he's found a "green" alternative: vats of Escherichia coli bacteria (single-cell organisms).
* Saliva, the mucus-filled slime that wets the mouth, crawls with microscopic bacteria (single-cell organisms) that enter from air, food, and dirty hands.
Insulin also prompts the skin to produce sebum, the greasy substance that clogs pores and attracts acne-promoting bacteria (single-cell organisms).

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