single

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single

(sing′gl) [L. singulus, individual, single]
1. Indivisible.
2. Unique.
3. Unmarried.
4. Lone; alone.
5. One only.
References in periodicals archive ?
These taxes continue to apply at $200,000 for single taxpayers and at $250,000 for married filing jointly; thus, a married couple filing jointly, where each spouse makes $190,000 in earned income, will owe an additional $1,170 ($130,000 x 0.9%) in tax, compared to owing nothing if they remained single.
According to the preamble, the proposed "exception" to the single taxpayer rule in section 41(c)(7) "harmonizes the application of sections 41(f) (1) and 41(c)(7)...." (5) The preamble explains the government's view that if a domestic member of the group incurs research expenditures and sells property to a foreign member of the group and the foreign corporate member then sells the product to a customer that does not give rise to gross receipts effectively connected with a U.S.
This amount is now $44,350 for single taxpayers and $66,250 for taxpayers married filing jointly.
In most instances where the provisions for joint assessment exist, the marginal tax rate brackets faced by a single taxpayer are simply doubled for married couples (e.g., Luxemburg); equivalently, the combined income of the couple is divided by two, and then the single taxpayer rate structure is applied (e.g., Portugal).
Rates for single taxpayers are higher than those for marrieds, whether you file jointly or married filing separately.
In order to correct this problem, the tax act phased in an expansion of the 15 percent bracket which is illustrated by the following table: Tax year Percentage of Single Taxpayer's 15% Tax Bracket (14) 2005 180 2006 187 2007 193 2008 and thereafter 200
That's less problematic than coalescing a lot of Independent physicians into an actual single taxpayer ID group practice.
You are a single taxpayer and have a child living with you - even if not yours - and are not claiming the additional personal allowance.
Thus, for a single taxpayer, the personal exemption surcharge will be added to the nominal capital gains maximum rate for all AGIs above the minimum threshold level of $100,000, but equal to or less than $225,000.
In one example described in the ruling, a single taxpayer itemizes and claims deductions totaling $15,000 on the taxpayers 2018 federal income tax return.
Example 1: Paula Adams, a single taxpayer who participates in a 401 (k), must have had modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) of $63,000 or less in 2018 for a full deduction on her 2018 tax return.