sin nombre virus

(redirected from Sin Nombre)

sin nombre virus

a species of Hantavirus in North America causing hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.
Synonym(s): Four Corners virus
[Spanish, without a name]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
A virus that causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome for which the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatis) is both reservoir and vector
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Sin Nom·bre vi·rus

(sēn nōm'brā vī'rŭs)
A species of Hantavirus in North America that causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.
Synonym(s): Four Corners virus.
[Spanish, without a name]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Following the identification of Sin Nombre virus (SNV) as the etiologic agent of HPS in the United States in 1993, many other hantaviruses have been identified in the Americas (3-6).
The movie will be directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga, who earlier helmed films like 'Sin Nombre', 'Jane Eyre' and 'Beasts of No Nation', reports Variety.
Serology obtained on hospital admission was positive for hantavirus immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G antibodies, with a positive result for Sin Nombre virus (SNV) (the primary etiologic agent of HPS in the United States) IgM at 1:6400, consistent with acute infection (Table).
Although there have been no human cases of HPS to date in Mexico (Vazquez-Perez et al., 2012), four hantaviruses have been documented in rodents that occur in Mexico: El Moro Canyon virus, Playa de Oro virus, Limestone Canyon virus, and Sin Nombre virus (Hjelle et al., 1995; Chu et al., 2008; Milazzo et al., 2012), with antibody prevalences ranging between 4% and 9% of samples tested.
Alicante: Universidad de Alicante (Cuadernos de America sin nombre num.
The keywords included hantavirus, New World hantaviruses, American hantaviruses, Sin nombre virus, Bayou virus, Black Creek Canal virus, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome; Leptospira interrogans, leptospirosis, Weil's disease; infectious disease outbreaks, climatic factors, and rodent-borne.