Weil

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Weil

(vīl),
Adolf, German physician, 1848-1916. See: Weil disease.

Weil

(vīl),
Edmund, Austrian physician, 1880-1922. See: Weil-Felix reaction, Weil-Felix test.

Weil

(vīl),
Ludwig A., German dentist, 1849-1895. See: Weil basal layer, Weil basal zone.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
But, like Simone Weil, Pasternak could not accept the Old Testament because it introduces the idea of the "chosen." For Mezhuev, chosen-ness in the Biblical sense must be accepted as a mystery, but a civilization that declares itself "chosen" veers necessarily toward amoralism.
Porque Simone Weil <<nunca renuncio a combatir los poderes opresivos; siempre se comprometio en esta lucha protagonizando empenos peligrosos e insolitos.
(19.) Quoted in Simone Petrement, Simone Weil: A Life, trans.
(25) Simone Weil is convinced that few can tolerate knowing that their actions (or inactions) may crush that basic anticipation of good that is found in fellow human beings.
A los catorce anos de edad, Simone Weil sufre la que podria ser considerada la crisis fundamental de su vida intelectual, la que ella misma relata como "una de esas situaciones de desesperanza sin fondo de la adolescencia" (Weil, 1993: 39) (3), que se desencadena ante el genio matematico de Andre, su hermano, frente al cual se siente torpe, limitada en su intelecto e incapaz de acceder a la verdad.
Where Camus is concerned, it's impossible to overstate the extent to which Simone Weil's thought and example counted in his intellectual and spiritual life, from the end of the war until his premature death.
Simone Weil fluidly and precisely describes this practice and the receptive consent to the subject that accompanies it in her response to stark contemporary circumstances earlier in the century.
While I was shifting the towering piles of paper from one spot to another, I came across an old photocopy of a text by Simone Weil: "The Iliad, Or the Poem of Force." Reading the fading pages, I sensed, quite unexpectedly, that this beautiful and searing essay on Homer's epic unearthed a deep connection between the two holidays, Memorial Day and Labor Day, that we Americans usually think of as merely the bookends to summer vacation.
Contemporary interest in Simone Weil's philosophical and religious writings presents something of a puzzle.
"Absolutely unmixed attention is prayer," wrote Simone Weil, and the intensity and humility with which Charles approaches her motifs shares something of that sensibility.