simian

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simian

(sĭm′ē-ən)
adj.
Relating to, characteristic of, or resembling a monkey or an ape: humans and other simian primates.
n.
1. A monkey or an ape.
2. A monkey or a nonhuman ape.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

simian

(sim′ē-ăn) [L. simia, ape fr. Gr. simos, snub-nosed]
1. Pert. to or resembling apes or monkeys.
2. An ape or monkey.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
So, he decides that succumbing to simian blackmail is a better proposition.
Spidey is a good kid, but he lacks the insights of Maurice, the stooped, copper-colored simian in "Dawn" whose speech sounds like it was scrambled by an errant deejay, but who nonetheless conveys a calm in his community.
Most simian malaria infections in humans can cause mild or moderate disease but often are self-limited, not requiring antimalarial therapy (1).
In the United States, the potential for not recognizing a Plasmodium infection of simian origin is high because diagnosis usually relies on microscopic examination of Giemsa-stained smears rather than diagnosis by molecular techniques.
The substantial number of recent human cases of simian malaria reported in Malaysia and the wider region (including the travel-associated case described in this report) underscores the need to define the scope and magnitude of the problem (2-8).
The genome of the simian and human malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi.
The proposed Chinese simian, dubbed Eosimias sinensis, displays several jaw and tooth features that distinguish it from adapids and omomyids, Beard argues.
Various investigators have promoted either omomyids or adapids living between 55 million and 36 million years ago as simian ancestors (SN: 1/12/91, p.20).
The oldest known simian fossil skull, dubbed Catopithecus by its discoverers, turned up in an Egyptian deposit in 1988 and dates to about 40 million years ago.
Catopithecus bears several anatomical traits that place it squarely in the simian realm, Simons maintains.
The new fossils also shed light on whether lemurlike adapids or tarsierlike omomyids living between 55 million and 36 million years ago qualify as simian ancestors.
Greg Gunnell, an anthropologist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, agrees that Simons' finds establish Catopithecus as the earliest known simian. Eosimias, the Chinese animal, remains an evolutionary enigma, based on the fragmentary remains uncovered so far, Gunnell adds.