silent killer

(redirected from Silent Lesion)
A popular term for any condition that may progress to very advanced stages before manifesting itself clinically
Examples Lifestyle disease—e.g., atherosclerosis, hypertension— certain cancers—e.g., colorectal, ovarian

silent killer

Silent lesion Medtalk Popular for a condition that may progress to very advanced stages before manifesting itself clinically
References in periodicals archive ?
The size and site of the symptomatic MRI lesion was consistent with, and the clinically silent lesion was characteristic for, MS due to its periventricular location and Dawson finger shape.
They can reveal the subclinical involvement of a sensory system (silent lesions) when demyelination is suggested by symptoms and/or signs in another area of the central nervous system (CNS).
In some rare but disabling conditions such as multiple sclerosis and optic neuritis, PRVEP records provide characteristic electrophysiologic findings even in clinically silent lesions. To conclude, they are sensitive adjuncts to diagnoses in various visual disorders and can also contribute as important monitoring tools for objectively assessing the recovery and ophthalmological status.
For diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome, whole-body scintigraphy is useful because in addition to increased tracer uptake in the affected bone, it also reveals clinically silent lesions. The bull's head sign is the pathognomonic of SAPHO syndrome which is characterized by manubrium sterni which represents the upper skull and the inflamed sternoclavicular joint with the adjacent clavicle representing the horns [25].
Paediatric multiple sclerosis: Detection of clinically silent lesions by multimodal evoked potentials.
Piriform sinus tumors are uncommon and silent lesions. Their prognosis is poor because these tumors are usually not detected until they have reached an advanced stage.
Thrombosis or stenotic lesions may also occur in the axillary, subclavian and innominate veins, or in the superior vena cava, and silent lesions have been reported to be relatively common.
Patients enrolled in the study were aged between 18 and 45 years when they had a first neurologic event suggestive of MS that lasted for at least 24 hours, and at least two clinically silent lesions, 3 mm or larger, on a T2-weighted brain MRI scan.
acute, active and silent lesions) and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) (Table 1).
Participants in the BENEFIT (Betaseron in Newly Emerging Multiple Sclerosis for Initial Treatment) trial were recruited within 60 days after their first demyelinating event and had at least two clinically silent lesions on magnetic resonance imaging.

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