sievert

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sievert

 [se´vert]
the SI unit of radiation absorbed dose equivalent, defined as that producing the same biologic effect in a specified tissue as 1 gray of high-energy x-rays; 1 sievert equals 100 rem.

sie·vert (Sv),

(sē'vĕrt),
The SI unit of ionizing radiation effective dose, equal to the absorbed dose in gray, weighted for both the quality of radiation in question and the tissue response to that radiation. The unit is the joule per kilogram and 1 Sv = 100 rem.
See also: effective dose, equivalent dose.
[R. M. Sievert, Swedish physicist, 1896-1966]

sievert

Sv Radiation physics The SI unit of biologically effective dose–equivalent dose of ionizing radiation that produces the same biological effect–of ionizing radiaction–dose equivalence; 1.0 Sv = 1.0 joule/kilogram or 100 rem. See Gray, Rad; Roentgen.

sie·vert

(Sv) (sē'vĕrt)
The SI unit of ionizing radiation effective dose, equal to the absorbed dose in gray, weighted for both the quality of radiation in question and the tissue response to that radiation. The unit is the joule per kilogram and 1 Sv = 100 rem.
See also: effective dose

sievert

The SI UNIT of equivalent absorbed dose of ionizing radiation. Compare RAD.

sie·vert

(Sv) (sē'vĕrt)
The SI unit of ionizing radiation effective dose.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company used equipment to measure radiation from a distance and was unable to ascertain the exact level because the device's maximum reading is 10 sieverts.
Ouchi's colleague Masato Shinohara was also exposed to an estimated 10 sieverts of radiation in the accident.
With the clarity of hindsight, Al Sieverts realizes today that he boarded a 1985 flight to Honolulu with mind-boggling naivete.
Recently, an exploratory robot malfunctioned and died after being sent inside reactor 2, in mid-February, due to exposure to "(http://www.ibtimes.com/fukushima-news-unimaginable-nuclear-reactor-radiation-so-destructive-not-even-robots-2489802) unimaginable " levels of radiation, close to 650 sieverts per hour.
Edelstein's calculations show that the crew would receive a radiation dose of more than 10,000 sieverts within a second.
The previous high was measured one year after the disaster at 73 Sieverts per hour.
The previous radiation high, measured one year after the disaster, was 73 Sieverts per hour.
The previous high was measured at 73 sieverts per hour, one year after the disaster.
were conducted inside the containment vessel of reactor 2 and showed a radiation level of 530 sieverts per hour, (http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2017/02/03/national/fukushima-radiation-level-highest-since-march-11/#.WJsX2G8rJQI) The Japan Times reported  last week.
Shinohara was exposed to an estimated 8 sieverts of radiation in the accident, which occurred Sept.
Shinohara was exposed to an estimated 8 sieverts of radiation at a JCO plant in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture, on Sept.
Shinohara was exposed to an estimated 8 sieverts of radiation at a uranium-processing plant in Tokaimaru, Ibaraki Prefecture, on Sept.