siderophore

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siderophore

 [sid´er-o-for]
a macrophage containing hemosiderin.

sid·er·o·phore

(sid'er-ō-fōr),
1. A large extravasated mononuclear phagocyte containing granules of hemosiderin, found in the sputum or in the lungs of patients with longstanding pulmonary congestion from left ventricular failure.
See also: heart failure cell.
2. Secreted molecule which chelates iron.
Synonym(s): siderophage
[sidero- + G. phoros, bearing]

siderophore

/sid·ero·phore/ (sid´er-o-for″) a macrophage containing hemosiderin.

sid·er·o·phore

(sid'ĕr-ō-fōr)
A large, extravasated, mononuclear phagocyte containing granules of hemosiderin, found in the sputum or in the lungs of people with long-standingpulmonary congestion from left ventricular failure.
Synonym(s): siderophage.
[sidero- + G. phoros, bearing]

siderophore

a macrophage containing hemosiderin.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rmpA gene increases capsule production making the organism resistant to phagocytosis and the Siderophore biosynthetic genes secrete greater amounts of siderophores (Aerobactin and salmochelin) that mediate iron acquisition from the host making them more virulent.
Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria make micronutrients such as phosphorus and zinc available for plant uptake, fix nitrogen, sequester iron for plant uptake by siderophores, and also produce plant hormones such as auxins (Lucy et al.
In addition, another benefit of these rhizobacteria is the action as plant-growth promoters (PGPR) through various mechanisms such as phosphate solubilization, production of phytohormones, siderophores, biocontrol of pathogens and pest insects (Carvalho et al.
In another, scientists rapidly identified and discovered new types of metal-binding molecules called siderophores, made by bacterial cells.
Oxidation of phenolate siderophores by the multicopper oxidase encoded by the Escherichia coli yacK gene.
tubiashii produces several potential virulence factors associated with its pathogenic capacity including extracellular metalloproteases and toxins such as hemolysins, cytotoxins, and siderophores (Hasegawa et al.
Enhanced plant growth by siderophores produced by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria.
iron chelating siderophores, fungal wall degrading enzyme Chitinase, ammonia and cyanide (Lovic et al.
In contrast, previous studies using polymers, such as alginate, demonstrated that among the growth-promoting rhizobacteria, the capacity to produce auxin hormones of the indole type or to produce siderophores during three years of storage was not affected in Pseudomonas (Trivedi & Pandey 2008).