siderophore

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siderophore

 [sid´er-o-for]
a macrophage containing hemosiderin.

sid·er·o·phore

(sid'er-ō-fōr),
1. A large extravasated mononuclear phagocyte containing granules of hemosiderin, found in the sputum or in the lungs of patients with longstanding pulmonary congestion from left ventricular failure.
See also: heart failure cell.
2. Secreted molecule which chelates iron.
Synonym(s): siderophage
[sidero- + G. phoros, bearing]

siderophore

/sid·ero·phore/ (sid´er-o-for″) a macrophage containing hemosiderin.

sid·er·o·phore

(sid'ĕr-ō-fōr)
A large, extravasated, mononuclear phagocyte containing granules of hemosiderin, found in the sputum or in the lungs of people with long-standingpulmonary congestion from left ventricular failure.
Synonym(s): siderophage.
[sidero- + G. phoros, bearing]

siderophore

a macrophage containing hemosiderin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quantification of hydroxamate siderophores in soil solutions of podzolic soil profiles in Sweden.
maltaromaticum involved in accessing iron in myoglobin was examined by evaluating the production of siderophores using a chrome azurol S (CAS) assay, and by examining the ability to bind heme, an iron compound, by growing the culture in a medium containing hematin.
The salicylate-derived mycobactin siderophores of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are essential for growth in macrophages.
Protection of cucumber against Pythium root rot by fluorescent pseudomonads: predominant role of induced resistance over siderophores and antibiosis.
2006) used a compost tea produced from grape marc waste to inhibit the growth of several soil-borne phytopathogenic fungi; it was concluded that the production of siderophores by the microbial species within the compost tea was responsible for reducing the effects of the fungal pathogen.
Among the topics are siderophores from bacteria and from fungi, haem uptake and iron extraction by bacteria, mechanisms and regulation of iron homeostasis in the Rhizobia, iron uptake in Shigella and Escherichia coli, haem and iron metabolism in Bacteriodes, iron dependence and transport in Cyanobacteria, and iron uptake in Staphylococci.
Much of the iron in ocean water is strongly bound to natural organic chelators, such as siderophores, which bind and release iron in different ways.
In order to survive in a human host, bacteria form siderophores called iron-regulated outer membrane proteins (IROMPs).
The researchers examined bacterial communities enveloping particles of sand and identified chemicals - called siderophores - produced by cultivable bacteria that act as growth factors for distantly related strains of uncultivable bacteria.
Bacteria and fungi counter these defenses by producing siderophores, which are proteins that are synthesized and exported to capture iron, with the resulting iron-siderophore complex endocytosed for use (3).
This is the same geometry and distances found in many known siderophores.