siddha

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siddha

Ayurvedic medicine
A permutation of ayurvedic medicine from the Tamil culture of southern India and Sri Lanka; many of the siddha remedies are basic elements—e.g., copper, gold, mercury, sulphur.
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This ability comes from years of study and practice with Holy Siddhas, Saints and Spiritual Masters, and is a beautiful healing experience that awakens one's true self to the presence of God.
As he indicates in the opening sentences of his acknowledgments (1: xxvii), Dyczkowski has lived most of the past thirty-five years "in India, the Holy Land of the Rsis, Siddhas and Yoginis.
bar] Khanda (KK), the first of the three divisions of this work (the others are the Yoga Khanda and Siddha Khanda).
An extensive commentary of the oral instruction of Tibetan yogins and siddhas of the twentieth century, Yantra Yoga is an enthusiastically recommended addition to Tibetan Buddhism studies shelves.
The Wisdom of Jesus and the Yoga Siddhas Marshall Govindan Babaji's Kriya Yoga & Publications, Inc.
Jesus Christ, the Buddha, Lao Tzu, and the great Hindu Siddhas and sages were able to experience high levels of consciousness which allowed them to understand the fundamental operations of the Universe.
The first text of Lion of Siddhas is a biography of East Indian Mahasiddha Padampa Sangye, well known as a lineage guru to all schools of Tibetan Buddhism.
et des pratiques transgressives qu'affectionnent notamment, dans leur excentricite, les Kapalikas, les Nath siddhas et les Aghoris hindous, et les siddha-s bouddhiques, et il souligne le processus d'epuration progressive et de transposition symbolique dont ces pratiques honnies ont fait progressivement l'objet (en particulier darts le Sivaisme du Cachemire et dans le bouddhisme esoterique japonais).
The bulk of the texts associated with the thought and medicine of the Siddhas appears to be much later.
Several times AG mentions Siddhas, of whom Matsyendranatha and Goraksanatha were the most famous.
The catalogue of powers varies from text to text, but the astamasiddhi 'eight great powers' form a stable core which siddhas invoke to control the world.
My analysis of this body of practice will be based to a certain extent on a literal reading of a small grouping of Sanskrit terms--kula ("family," "clan"), dravyam ("fluid"), mukham ("mouth"), vira ("Virile Hero"), siddha ("Perfected Being"), and khecara ("flight")-- complemented by iconographic and ethnographic evidence from the medieval as well as the modern periods.