sibilant

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Related to Sibilants: Affricates, Fricatives

sibilant

 [sib´ĭ-lant]
shrill, whistling, or hissing.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sib·i·lant

(sib'i-lănt),
Hissing or whistling in character; denoting a form of rhonchus.
[L. sibilans (-ant-), pres. p. of sibilo, to hiss]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sibilant

adjective Whistling, hissing.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

sibilant

Physical exam adjective Whistling, hissing
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sib·i·lant

(sib'i-lănt)
Hissing or whistling in character; denoting a form of rhonchus.
[L. sibilans (-ant-), pres. p. of sibilo, to hiss]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sibilant

1. Hissing.
2. A speech sound, such as ‘s’, ‘sh’ or ‘z’.
3. A sibilant consonant.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

sib·i·lant

(sib'i-lănt)
Hissing or whistling in character; denoting a form of rhonchus.
[L. sibilans (-ant-), pres. p. of sibilo, to hiss]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Another idea can be projected that whenever linearity is violated in sibilants metathesis in Balochi, in a cluster of stop - fricative, stop occupies onset position that is a favorable position for a stop (10a and b).
The articulation disorders in producing hissing sibilant sounds in Arabic: Descriptive-analytical study.
Turner concludes from these observations (1927: 22f.) that at the time of the Ashoka inscriptions the clusters with sibilants had already been changed except in Girnar (south-west) and Shahbazgarhi (north-west).
Translating [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] as `unrein' (impure), he suggested a connection with the Aeolic dialect of Pindar's birthplace, Boeotia, which tended to have dental consonants where other dialects had sibilants.(13) The idea lacks conviction, as Pindar commonly uses a standard literary Doric devoid of dialectal variants.(14) A more likely candidate for the unusual pronunciation of s might be Arion of Methymna, to whose alleged invention of the [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] at the Dorian-speaking court of Periander of Corinth (c.
A variety of vocalizations are used, from sibilants, such as "S's" and "Tz's," to the enunciation of NE-COM-PE, which is an acronym for "New England Conservatory of Music Percussion Ensemble," for whom the piece was written.
'Nobody who dislikth or maltreatth animalth can be a good thort,' stated the admiral, lisping on his sibilants in his passion.
Livonian and Saltna Leivu share their characteristic shift of sibilants from palatalized alveolar to prepalatal [s] and [z].
Exercises that might help develop this control include sustained vocalizing on lip or tongue trills, raspberries, and voiced fricatives or sibilants (/v/ or /z/).
Perhaps diction could have been clearer, but this may be due to the sibilants of Neil Jenkins' otherwise gratifyingly intelligent English translation.
ear, attuned to its sibilants, assures him he is unsafe.
Thus, it would be much more descriptively adequate to discuss the matter in terms of phonological conditioning, i.e., the plural is [-[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]z] after sibilants, rather than add <-es> after sibilants (pp.
And then the whispering, the hissing and spitting of sibilants into my ear and down my neck.