shrew

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Related to Shrews: Soricidae

shrew

a small, 2 to 3 inches long, pointed-nosed, insectivorous mammal which has a moderately long tail and a very savage disposition. They are members of the family Soricidae and there are a large number of species including the common shrew (Sorex araneus).

shrew virus
a rhabdovirus with some antigenic relationship to rabies virus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chow Time An elephant shrew uses its nose to find food, and its long tongue to flick food into its mouth.
Shrews soon took a firm grip and went close as Jermaine Grandison's shot was deflected for a corner by Cole Kpekawa, before Jean-Louis Akpa Akpro set up Cameron Gayle, whose angled drive brought a smart save out of Paul Jones.
Shrews boss Micky Mellon said: "I thought the performance was very good and we've been undone by a fine detail from a corner.
Kits for shrews were not commercially available in China, so we were unable to test the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA for detecting SFTSV in serum from shrews.
The connection comes from DNA analyses that place elephant shrews in the Afrotheria group with real elephants, sea cows, aardvarks and some other African mammals.
Shrews typically live for only just over a year and the most likely time to come across one is as a sad little scrap of inanimate velvet lying dead by the side of a path.
A new species of the hero shrew has been identified by scientists.
The anterior teeth (incisors and antemolars) are highly specialized in shrews (Dannelid 1998), but the molars are quite uniform in the Soricidae.
The Shrews have lost just three league matches this season - only one of them against a team from outside the current top six - and they would have to be well below par to miss out on a place in the second round.
Understanding patterns of diversity of shrews in the Great Basin and other regions is hampered by the fact that many species have narrow ecological distributions or are particularly difficult to capture with conventional small-mammal traps (Kirkland and Sheppard, 1994; Rickart and Heaney, 2001; Shohfi et al.
Researchers may have discovered a previously unknown species of the giant elephant shrew - a small mammal with a nose like a trunk - in a remote Kenyan forest.
Even though their name and appearance suggest otherwise, elephant-shrews are more closely related to aardvarks, sea cows, and elephants than they are to shrews.