Shigella


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Shigella

 [shĭ-gel´ah]
a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile, rod-shaped bacteria containing four species that are differentiated by biochemical reactions: S. dysente´riae (subgroup A), S. flex´�neri (subgroup B), S. boy´dii (subgroup C), and S. son´nei (subgroup D). Their normal habitat is the intestinal tract of humans and higher monkeys; all species cause dysentery.

shigella

 [shĭ-gel´ah]
any individual organism of the genus Shigella.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Shigella

(shē-gel'lă),
A genus of nonmotile, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative nonencapsulated rods. These organisms cannot use citrate as a sole source of carbon; their growth is inhibited by potassium cyanide and their metabolism is fermentative; they ferment glucose and other carbohydrates with the production of acid but not gas; lactose is ordinarily not fermented, although it is sometimes slowly attacked; the normal habitat is the intestinal tract of humans and of higher apes; all of the species produce dysentery. The type species is Shigella dysenteriae.
[Kiyoshi Shiga]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

shigella

(shĭ-gĕl′ə)
n. pl. shi·gellae (-gĕl′ē) also shi·gellas
Any of various nonmotile, rod-shaped bacteria of the genus Shigella, which includes some species that cause dysentery.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Shigella

Microbiology A genus of gram-negative bacilli of the family Enterobacteriaceae, and major cause of bacterial dysentery
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Shi·gel·la

(shē-gel'lă)
A genus of nonmotile, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria containing gram-negative, non-spore-forming rods. A major cause of dysentery.
[Kiyoshi Shiga]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Shiga,

Kiyoshi, Japanese bacteriologist, 1870-1957.
Shigella boydii - a species found in feces of symptomatic individuals.
Shigella dysenteriae - a species causing dysentery in humans and in monkeys. Synonym(s): Shiga bacillus; Shiga-Kruse bacillus
Shigella flexneri - a species found in the feces of symptomatic individuals and of convalescents or carriers; the most common cause of dysentery epidemics and sometimes of infantile gastroenteritis. Synonym(s): Flexner bacillus; paradysentery bacillus
Shigella sonnei - a species causing mild dysentery and also summer diarrhea in children. Synonym(s): Sonne bacillus
Shigella - a genus of nonmotile, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae), all of whose species produce dysentery.
Shiga bacillus - Synonym(s): Shigella dysenteriae
Shiga-Kruse bacillus - Synonym(s): Shigella dysenteriae
shigellosis - bacillary dysentery caused by bacteria of the genus Shigella.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012

Shi·gel·la

(shē-gel'lă)
Genus of nonmotile, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria with habitat in the intestinal tract of humans and of higher apes; all species produce dysentery.
[Kiyoshi Shiga]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
dysentriato cytotoxic of RD or L20B cell lines, but there are many articles showed the cytotoxic effect of Shigella spp on other mammalian cell line.
Since, Virulence of Shigella species depends upon the mucosal penetration and subsequent intraepithelial multiplication.
Anti-enteric bacterial activity and phytochemical analysis of the seed kernel extract of Mangifera indica Linnaeus against Shigella dysentriae (Shiga, corrig.) Castellani and Chalmers.
A total of 80 bacterial isolates were collected including salmonella, shigella, vibrio, aeromonas and E.coli, 46 (57.5%) were collected during March to December-2013 and 34 (42.5%) were collected during January to November-2014.
"As with so many infections, the best way to avoid catching shigella or passing it to others is by washing your hands very regularly and carefully with soap and water, particularly after using the toilet, changing nappies and before eating or preparing food," Dr Kevin Carroll added.
(8,9) The distribution of Shigella serogroups/ serotypes and antimicrobial resistance differs over time and place.
The World Health Organisation (WHO) recognises shigella as a bacterium that is "the greatest threat to human health".
Las enfermedades mas comunes adquiridas por la ingesta de alimentos contaminados son causadas por enteropatogenos principalmente Salmonella y Shigella, siendo estas capaces de afectar la salud de la poblacion, principalmente, a los lactantes, ninos, embarazadas, ancianos y personas con enfermedades subyacentes (1,2).
In 2013, public health laboratories in New York City (NYC), New York, USA, began testing susceptibility of Shigella isolates to azithromycin.
Shigella is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic, nonmotile, nonspore forming, and rod-shaped true bacteria closely related to Salmonella and Escherichia coli.
Worldwide, Shigella is a common food-borne bacterial cause of dysentery and rarely causes bacteremia in the immunocompromised host [1, 2].