humerus

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humerus

 [hu´mer-us] (pl. hu´meri) (L.)
the bone of the upper arm, extending from shoulder to elbow, consisting of a shaft and two enlarged extremities. The proximal end has a smooth round head that articulates with the scapula to form the shoulder joint. Just below the head are two rounded processes called the greater and lesser tubercles; the area just below the tubercles is called the “surgical neck,” because of its liability to fracture. The distal end of the humerus has two articulating surfaces: the trochlea, which articulates with the ulna, and the capitulum, which articulates with the radius at the elbow. and see Appendices.
Humerus. From Applegate, 2000.

hu·mer·us

, gen. and pl.

hu·mer·i

(hyū'mĕr-ŭs, -ī), [TA]
The bone of the arm, articulating with the scapula above and the radius and ulna below.
Synonym(s): arm bone
[L. shoulder]

humerus

(hyo͞o′mər-əs)
n. pl. hu·meri (-mə-rī′)
The long bone of the arm or forelimb, extending from the shoulder to the elbow.

hu·mer·us

(hyū'mĕr-ŭs) [TA]
The bone of the arm, articulating with the scapula above and the radius and ulna below.
[L. shoulder]

humerus

(hu'mer-us) [L. humerus, upper arm, shoulder]
Enlarge picture
HUMERUS
The bone of the upper arm; it articulates with the scapula at the shoulder and with the ulna and radius at the elbow. See: illustration

anatomical neck of humerus

The constricted segment of the humerus between the head and the greater tubercle.

fracture of humerus

See: fracture.

humerus

The long upper arm bone that articulates at its upper end with a shallow cup in a side process of the shoulder blade (scapula) and, at its lower end with the RADIUS and ULNA bones of the lower arm.

humerus

the bone of the vertebrate forelimb (or arm) nearest to the body, to which it is attached at the shoulder. It is attached distally to the RADIUS and ULNA at the elbow.

Humerus

The bone of the upper arm.
Mentioned in: Osteomyelitis
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The friend of mine with the digeridoo, an Afrikaner who's fascinated by the biblical Jews' wanderings through hostile lands, assembled a seder plate with me last year out of wasabi maror and a faux rhino horn for a shank bone.
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