sexual behaviour

(redirected from Sexual practices)
A person’s sexual practices—i.e., whether he/she engages in heterosexual or homosexual activity

sexual behaviour

any behaviour associated with courtship and reproduction.
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers addressed the gender gap regarding the personal preferences of heterosexual anal sex partners, noting a strong social trend of normalizing often "painful" sexual practices, such as anal intercourse.
Among the differences are that few grew up in a Buddhist environment or have Buddhist parents, and that they believe that their religion places few if any constraints on their sexuality and sexual practices.
Daran said the DOH needs to advocate safe sexual practices and prevent a projected rise of HIV-AIDS cases to 133,000 patients by 2022.
At the time, some detractors alleged that vaccinating young girls against HPV, a sexually transmitted disease that can cause cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancers, would encourage sexual activity and unsafe sexual practices.
THOUSANDS of gay men are expected to take part in a new online survey on sexual practices.
As someone wrote recently, women who would look askance at being asked to take part in the often brutal sexual practices described, can't seem to get enough of the film and book.
Sociological and medical data on sexual practices and STDs is presented and interpreted, followed by sections on social control of sexuality, sexual violence, and sex work.
This study explored sexual practices and sex-seeking behaviours in a sample of 222 East and Southeast Asian men recruited through two gay venues.
3 ( ANI ): For long, watching porn has been blamed for increase in sexual practices among teens but a new study has suggested that explicit material only has a small impact.
the groove at the base of the glans), or in social and demographic characteristics, sexual practices and STIs.
Couples were surveyed about lifetime risk factors for HCV infection, sexual practices of the couple, and sharing of personal items.
News that the Church of England has lifted its ban on gay clergymen in civil partnerships becoming bishops, but only if they promise to stay celibate, raises a pertinent question: In the interests of equality, shouldn't married heterosexual bishops be made to promise they will not engage in similar sexual practices with their wives?