sexual dimorphism

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dimorphism

 [di-mor´fizm]
the quality of existing in two distinct forms. adj., adj dimor´phic, dimor´phous.
sexual dimorphism physical or behavioral differences associated with sex.
having some properties of both sexes, as in the early embryo and in some hermaphrodites.

sex·u·al di·mor·phism

the somatic differences within species between male and female individuals that arise as a consequence of sexual maturation; inclusive of, but not restricted to, the secondary sexual characteristics.
A physical dichotomy between males and females of a particular species

sex·u·al di·morph·ism

(sek'shū-ăl dī-mōr'fizm)
The somatic differences within species between male and female individuals that arise as a consequence of sexual maturation, including, but not restricted to, the secondary sexual characters.

sexual dimorphism

the presence in a population of two sexes each with a different PHENOTYPE, a classic example of a GENETIC POLYMORPHISM. The underlying mechanism varies in different organisms, but is often controlled by genes on special SEX CHROMOSOMES (see SEX DETERMINATION).

sex·u·al di·morph·ism

(sek'shū-ăl dī-mōr'fizm)
Somatic differences within species between male and female individuals that arise as a consequence of sexual maturation.

dimorphism

the quality of existing in two distinct forms.

sexual dimorphism
1. physical or behavioral differences associated with sex; males and females of the same species are different in appearance.
2. having some properties of both sexes, as in the early embryo and in some hermaphrodites.

sexual

pertaining to sex.

sexual behavior
includes masturbation, courtship, mating, estral display.
sexual cycle
estral cycle.
sexual differentiation
identification of the sex of a patient is done usually by an examination of external genitalia; preparation and examination of a karyotype is the preferred laboratory method.
sexual dimorphism
differences in structure or physical characteristics between males and females of the same species, e.g. horns in some breeds of sheep, feather coat color in many species of birds.
sexual intercourse
see mating.
sexual maturity
capable of mating. Occurs at different ages in different species and in different races and even breeds.
sexual receptivity
behavioral changes in female animals at the time of estrus; involves acceptance of male efforts at copulation and, in some species, actively seeking the male.
sexual rest
circumstances in which no sexual intercourse takes place.
References in periodicals archive ?
An independent t-test was used to assess the presence of statistically significant sexual dimorphism between males and females in conchal measurements.
Crooks N, Waring CP (2013b) Sexual dimorphisms in the dermal structure of the lesser-spotted catshark, Scyliorhinus canicula (Linnaeus, 1758).
canjerana presents sexual dimorphism in some inflorescence characteristics, such as larger male inflorescences with higher number of flowers than female inflorescences.
Sexual dimorphism in height, weight and BMI was displayed [Table 3].
Herein we document a previously overlooked sexual dimorphism in a well-studied shark species, Sphyrna tiburo (Linnaeus, 1758), the bonnethead shark.
Sulfotransferase activity demonstrated no sexual dimorphism at any of the sites investigated, although elevated activity was observed in males from the Lake Okeechobee watershed compared to those from Lake Woodruff.
The present study had three objectives: (1) to report von Bertalanffy parameter estimates for four additional species of Graptemys, and thereby evaluate the effect of sexual dimorphism in adult size on parameter estimates; (2) to compare parameter estimates for Graptemys to those of other emydid turtles through analysis of the relationship of k with P[L.
Sexual dimorphism for overall size (assessed as total length) in the Gerridae is characterized by significant hypoallometry (decline in SSD with increasing body size) superimposed upon a plesiomorphic female bias (Fairbairn 1990; Andersen 1993, 1994).
Finally, how might sexual dimorphism of certain traits enable females to compensate physiologically in terms of overall growth?
Sexual dimorphism has been a long-standing problem for evolutionary biology (Darwin, 1871; Selander, 1966, 1972; Ralls, 1977; Alexander et al.
monogamous species) should show little sexual dimorphism.