lust

(redirected from Sexual desires)
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lust

A poetic (i.e., non-medical) term for intense sexual desire for another person or, less commonly, an object.
References in periodicals archive ?
Critics, however, prefer to categorize asexuality as a sexual dysfunction, such as hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD), instead of as a sexual orientation.
10) The warning is clear: acceptance within the asexual/ace community might dissuade (sexual) people with low sexual desire from seeking treatment and being "cured.
Contrary to beliefs that a man seeing his partner in the throes of labour is a turn-off, the study found that women whose partners were in the delivery room reported stronger sexual desire post-birth.
These marriages, however, never take place, and, most noticeably in the description of Susan, the desire for her is "beyond the sea," rather than having actual romantic love or sexual desire exist in Narnia.
His dubious and rather imperialistic claim that other parts of the world now also display a similar "massive convergence" toward total body sex does not distract from the fact that any extrapolation about human sexual desire from such a limited population sample is suspect.
The key statistical question is whether the sexual desires of women in their early 30s significantly differ from the other age categories in ways that support or refute Hypotheses 1 and 2.
The tensions and creative interactions among sexual desire, creative production or "singing," and the temptations of social acceptance form the central conflict of much of "The Black Christ.
ABSTRACT: This review defines sexual desire, distinguishes sexual desire from other sexual experiences (e.
Ironically, the only woman Mariah can turn to for help in getting the money necessary for delivering her baby in a hospital is Bannie Upshire Dudley, the white woman whose sexual desire for Mariah's father-in-law caused--or at least exacerbated--the town's economic hardship in the first place.
What becomes clear, however, is that Morrison is not simply telling the story of the conflicting sexual desires of Violet Trace, her husband Joe, and his eighteen-year-old lover Dorcas.
Denney, Field and Quandagno's (1984) study of sex differences in sexual needs and desires concluded that women's sexual interactions are often arranged to fulfil men's desires, and that men are frequently uninformed regarding women's sexual desires.