pheromone

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pheromone

 [fer´o-mōn]
a substance secreted to the outside of the body and perceived (as by smell) by other individuals of the same species, releasing specific behavior in the percipient.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pher·o·mone

(fer'ō-mōn),
A type of ectohormone secreted by an individual and perceived by a second individual of the same or similar species, thereby producing a change in the sexual or social behavior of that individual. Compare: allelochemicals, allomone, kairomone.
[G. pherō, to carry, + hormaō, to excite, stimulate]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pheromone

(fĕr′ə-mōn′)
n.
A chemical secreted by an animal, especially an insect, that influences the behavior or physiology of others of the same species, as by attracting members of the opposite sex or marking the route to a food source.

pher′o·mon′al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pheromone

A secreted or excreted chemical factor that triggers a social response in members of the same species, which fall into one of three broad categories:  alarm pheromones, food trail pheromones, and sex pheromones.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pheromone

An odorous body secretion that affects the behaviour of other individuals of the same species, acting as a sex attractant or in other ways. Pheromones are important in many animal species but, until recently, were thought to be unimportant in humans. It has now been shown, however, that the timing of ovulation in women can be controlled by pheromones from the armpit. This is believed to be the explanation of the fact that women living together will frequently develop synchronized menstrual cycles.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

pheromone

a chemical substance used in communication between organisms of the same species. Pheromones are found mainly in animals, but they occur in some lower plant groups where a chemical is secreted into water by female gametes to attract male gametes. In animals, for example, pheromones are transmitted in the air, as in female emperor and eggar moths, which secrete a chemical that is attractive to males over large distances, or by a dog marking out his territory with urine. Insect pheromones have been used to trap females of serious pests.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Isolation and identification of a component of the female sex pheromone gland attractive to male Xylomyges curialis.
Identification of a new sex pheromone from the silk dragline of the
Herein, we describe a new [13C + 1C] synthetic strategy for the sex pheromone of ACB from commercially available and cheap industrial brassylic acid as key starting material (Scheme 1, bottom).
Older female flies may release less sex pheromone and thus are not as attractive as newly virgin females to virgin male flies.
Generally, any type of molecule can be a sex pheromone. Molecules from small to large, volatile to nonvolatile, and low to high polarity have been reported as pheromone in animals (Wyatt, 2003, 2014).
Identification of critical secondary components of the sex pheromone of the navel orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).
molesta to nanofibers containing synthetic sex pheromone in field conditions; v) quantify the pheromone in PVAc and PCL nanofibers by gas chromatography and; vi) determine the morphology of the nanofibers produced by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).
Its female-produced sex pheromone was identified in 2006 by Gries et al.
For example, trail pheromones guide workers from nest to food sources, queen pheromones attract workers, and sex pheromones bring males and females together for mating.
Kuenen, "Sex pheromones and behavioral biology of the coniferophagous Choristoneura," Annual Review of Entomology, vol.
Characterization of soluble sex pheromone in a simultaneous hermaphroditic shrimp, Lysmata wurdemanni.