Seveso Directive

Seveso Directive

A series of EU directives developed as a result of the Seveso accident in 1976, which applies to around 10,000 industrial establishments where dangerous substances are used or stored in large quantities, mainly in the chemicals, petrochemicals, storage, and metal-refining sectors. The Directives oblige Member States to ensure that operators have a policy in place to prevent major accidents.
References in periodicals archive ?
The capex programme under consideration has significant potential E&S benefits, particularly in relation to implementation of safety upgrades in line with the requirements of the EU Seveso Directive.
The Seveso Directive was the first EU policy mandating
the Seveso Directives are limited to prevention of major hazardous
The European Community's institutional response to the Seveso disaster was given by Council Directive 82/501/EEC on the major accident hazards of certain industrial activities, the so-called Seveso Directive.
This could explain why the Seveso Directive does not include specific recommendations in order to limit the concentration of risky activities.
Lacoursiere is an external reviewer of the Accidental Risk Methodology for Industries in the Context of the Seveso Directive, a project of the 5th Framework Research Programme of the European Commission.
The European Community already has the Seveso Directive - a regulation that addresses the handling of hazardous materials.
This incident lead to the development of the Seveso Directive Control of Major Accident Hazards from Industrial Installations in the European Community.
monitoring reports, data on hand swelling, inquiries, applicable decisions and Seveso Directive.
Noble's MP makes considerable reference to the requirements of the Seveso Directives, but fails to comment on other essentials such as a well-equipped and trained fire brigade on land and at sea.