Seveso Directive

Seveso Directive

A series of EU directives developed as a result of the Seveso accident in 1976, which applies to around 10,000 industrial establishments where dangerous substances are used or stored in large quantities, mainly in the chemicals, petrochemicals, storage, and metal-refining sectors. The Directives oblige Member States to ensure that operators have a policy in place to prevent major accidents.
References in periodicals archive ?
He referred to the EU's Seveso Directive on major industrial accidents involving dangerous chemicals.
This project is aimed to support Seveso Directive implementation, including fulfilling the Lessons Learned obligation.
The target provides laboratory services for determining material properties and reaction parameters, as well as consulting services focused on thermal process safety, explosion prevention and safety concerns related to the Seveso Directive.
Upcoming proposals on a strategy on endocrine disrupters, ship scrapping and batteries and accumulators, as well as further work on revision of the Seveso directive (control of industrial accidents), the directive on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and sulphur content of marine fuels are regulatory issues on which Copenhagen intends to advance or even seal agreements by the end of its term.
The European Community's institutional response to the Seveso disaster was given by Council Directive 82/501/EEC on the major accident hazards of certain industrial activities, the so-called Seveso Directive.
One result of activities related to the Seveso Directive is inventory of sources, emissions and imissions of PCDD/F.
The European Community already has the Seveso Directive - a regulation that addresses the handling of hazardous materials.
This incident lead to the development of the Seveso Directive Control of Major Accident Hazards from Industrial Installations in the European Community.
This WP is the same Scientific support to EU Seveso Directive Implementation Institutional (4383) but represents only the competitive resources (same deliverables).
In March 2010, the court found that Spain was failing to implement the Seveso Directive, legislation that obliges member states to draw up emergency plans to cover major accidents involving dangerous substances.
The capex programme under consideration has significant potential E&S benefits, particularly in relation to implementation of safety upgrades in line with the requirements of the EU Seveso Directive.