Seventh-Day Adventists

(redirected from Seventh Day Adventists)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Seventh-Day Adventists

A branch of Protestantism founded by Ellen G White (1827–1915), which adheres to certain health-related guidelines. Seventh-Day Adventists abstain from alcohol and tobacco; consume a simple, strictly vegetarian diet; exercise; bathe regularly; and may use prayer instead of physicians, who are consulted when necessary.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Seventh Day Adventists accept the Bible as their only creed and hold certain fundamental beliefs to be the teaching of the Holy Scriptures.
(3.) Seventh Day Adventists. Web site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seventh-day-Adventist_Church Accessed November 4, 2010.
Historical Dictionary of Seventh Day Adventists Web site: http://books.google.com/ Accessed November 5, 2010
(9.) North Lake Seventh Day Adventists. Spiritual gifts and ministries.
3, in the South Lancaster Village Church of Seventh Day Adventists, 75 Sawyer St., South Lancaster.
Members of the Drum Corps of the Pathfinders (above) perform for the congregation (right) as the Seventh Day Adventists celebrated the 100th anniversary of their church in Coventry.
Bill Beamish, UK spokesman for the Seventh Day Adventist Church, said: "Gordon is rightly standing up for what he believes.
"Having a Seventh Day Adventist family on a major national TV programme is a coup for our church.
Most Seventh Day Adventists consume very little alcohol, meat, and caffeine, and health researchers suspected this might help explain why Adventists live longer than other Americans and suffer one-seventh as many heart attacks.
Dath rates from cancer among Seventh Day Adventists in the Los Angeles area are only about half those of the general population, according to Padmanabhan Nair, a chemist at the Lipid Nutrition Laboratory.
Immigration Authority officers have arrested the senior leaders of the Seventh Day Adventist church in Petach Tikva on suspicion that they have been involved in missionary work.
During the investigation, it became clear to the police that the Seventh Day Adventist leaders were not only allegedly breaking laws regarding missionary activity, but also they have been in the country illegally for more than a decade.