creatinine

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Related to Serum creatinine: blood urea

creatinine

 [kre-at´ĭ-nin]
a nitrogenous compound formed as the end product of creatine metabolism. It is formed in the muscle in relatively small amounts, passes into the blood and is excreted in the urine. A laboratory test for the creatinine level in the blood may be used as a measurement of kidney function (see creatinine clearance).
creatinine clearance test a test of renal function based on the rate of creatinine clearance.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cre·at·i·nine (Cr),

(krē-at'i-nēn, -nin), Do not confuse this word with creatine.
A component of urine and the final product of creatine catabolism; formed by the nonenzymatic dephosphorylative cyclization of phosphocreatine to form the internal anhydride of creatine.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

creatinine

(krē-ăt′n-ēn′, -ĭn)
n.
A creatine anhydride, C4H7N3O, formed by the metabolism of creatine, that is found in muscle tissue and blood and normally excreted in the urine as a metabolic waste.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

creatinine

Nephrology The end product of creatine metabolism, which is excreted into the urine; creatinine can be used to diagnose and monitor renal failure; creatinine may be measured in amniotic fluid to determine gestational age–fetal maturity index; normal ranges vary according to the lab. See Creatinine clearance.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cre·at·i·nine

(Cr) (krē-at'i-nin)
A component of urine and the final product of creatine catabolism; formed by the nonenzymatic dephosphorylative cyclization of phosphocreatine to form the internal anhydride of creatine.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

creatinine

A breakdown product of the important nitrogenous metabolic substance CREATINE. Creatinine is a normal metabolic waste substance and is found in muscle and blood and excreted in the urine.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

creatinine

the nitrogenous waste material of muscle creatine.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Creatinine

The metabolized by-product of creatine, an organic acid that assists the body in producing muscle contractions. Creatinine is found in the bloodstream and in muscle tissue. It is removed from the blood by the kidneys and excreted in the urine.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

cre·at·i·nine

(Cr) (krē-at'i-nin)
A component of urine and the final product of creatine catabolism; formed by the nonenzymatic dephosphorylative cyclization of phosphocreatine to form the internal anhydride of creatine.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The results showed that the patient's urine volume obviously increased six hours after treatment, reaching 2 to 4 ml * kg-1 * h-1 target urine volume; the levels of blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine and serum potassium decreased compared with before treatment; pH and oxygenation index increased compared with before treatment; the average mechanical ventilation time was (36.34 +- 10.81) h; 88.9% of the patients had renal function recovery and were successfully removed from equipment, with their prognosis improved.
Mean Value of Serum Creatinine and GFR Variables Mean [+ or -] S.D.
pre-hypertension over dependant variables taken as serum Cystatin-C and serum creatinine. Predictor probabilities were derived after running the logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was applied by using predictor probabilities as test variable and serum Cystatin-c and serum creatinine as state variables in order to find the area under curve (AUC), sensitivity and specifity of serum Cystatin-c and serum creatinine.
Serum creatinine returned to baseline in 49 patients, and for 11 patients, SSerum creatinine did not return to baseline after treatment as there were having pre-existing CKD.
Among those with abnormal serum creatinine at initial presentation, 4 patients had normalized serum creatinine, 2 had partial remission, and one had worsening renal function.
In conclusion, in patients with SBO, elevated serum lipase is a risk factor for higher serum creatinine and lactate levels, use of ICU, and mortality.
In a study conducted in 2009 by Abe et al 12) reported that incidence of CIN labeled as an absolute increase in serum creatinine [greater than or equal to]0.5mg/dl, or [greater than or equal to]25% increase from baseline after cardiac catheterization.
When the analysers connect to laboratory information system (LIS), the test results of serum creatinine can automatically generate eGFR (5).
Akbari, "Serum creatinine is an inadequate screening test for renal failure in elderly patients," JAMA Internal Medicine, vol.
During preoperative anesthesia assessment 21 days prior, he demonstrated baseline renal function with a serum creatinine of 1.02 mg/dL and eGFR of 94.27 mL/min/1.73 [m.sup.2].
The earliest detectable abnormality of nephropathy is microalbuminuria followed by decrease in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and increase in serum creatinine concentrations.[3] This study was planned with the objectives: (i) To measure and compare the levels of serum urea and serum creatinine in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic subjects with those of non-diabetic subjects and (ii) to correlate the relationship of serum urea and creatinine levels in diabetic subjects with duration of diabetes and glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c).
Twenty years ago, the rising incidence and prevalence of kidney failure treated by dialysis and transplantation (end-stage renal disease) had been identified as a public health threat, but difficulty in properly relating measured serum creatinine (Scr) values to the level of kidney function had hampered efforts to describe the earlier stages of the disease.