Serotonin

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serotonin

 [ser″o-to´nin]
a hormone and neurotransmitter, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), found in many tissues, including blood platelets, intestinal mucosa, pineal body, and central nervous system; it has many physiologic properties, including inhibition of gastric secretion, stimulation of smooth muscles, and production of vasoconstriction.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ser·o·to·nin

(ser'ō-tō'nin),
A vasoconstrictor, liberated by blood platelets, that inhibits gastric secretion and stimulates smooth muscle; present in relatively high concentrations in some areas of the central nervous system (hypothalamus, basal ganglia), and occurring in many peripheral tissues and cells and in carcinoid tumors.
[sero- + G. tonos, tone, tension, + -in]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

serotonin

(sĕr′ə-tō′nĭn, sîr′-)
n.
An organic compound, C10H12N2O, that is formed from tryptophan and is found especially in the gastrointestinal tract, the platelets, and the nervous system of humans and other animals, and functions as a neurotransmitter and in vasoconstriction, stimulation of the smooth muscles, and regulation of cyclic body processes.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ser·o·to·nin

(ser'ŏ-tō'nin)
A vasoconstrictor, liberated by platelets; inhibits gastric secretion and stimulates smooth muscle; also acts as a neurotransmitter; present in the central nervous system, many peripheral tissues and cells, and carcinoid tumors.
Synonym(s): 5-hydroxytryptamine.
[L. serum + G. tonos, tone, tension, + -in]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

serotonin

5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). A NEUROTRANSMITTER and HORMONE found in many tissues, especially the brain, the intestinal lining and the blood platelets. Serotonin is concerned in controlling mood and levels of consciousness. Its action is disturbed by some hallucinogenic drugs and imitated by others. It constricts small blood vessels, cuts down acid secretion by the stomach and contracts the muscles in the wall of the intestine.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

serotonin

a pharmacologically active compound, derived from tryptophan, which acts as a vasodilator, increases capillary permeability, and causes contraction of smooth muscle.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Serotonin

A chemical produced by the brain that functions as a neurotransmitter. Low serotonin levels are associated with mood disorders, particularly depression. Medications known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are used to treat BDD and other disorders characterized by depressed mood.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ser·o·to·nin

(ser'ŏ-tō'nin)
A vasoconstrictor, liberated by platelets; inhibits gastric secretion and stimulates smooth muscle; also acts as a neurotransmitter; present in the central nervous system, many peripheral tissues and cells, and carcinoid tumors.
Synonym(s): 5-hydroxytryptamine.
[L. serum + G. tonos, tone, tension, + -in]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012