Serotonin


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Related to Serotonin: dopamine, melatonin

serotonin

 [ser″o-to´nin]
a hormone and neurotransmitter, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), found in many tissues, including blood platelets, intestinal mucosa, pineal body, and central nervous system; it has many physiologic properties, including inhibition of gastric secretion, stimulation of smooth muscles, and production of vasoconstriction.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ser·o·to·nin

(ser'ō-tō'nin),
A vasoconstrictor, liberated by blood platelets, that inhibits gastric secretion and stimulates smooth muscle; present in relatively high concentrations in some areas of the central nervous system (hypothalamus, basal ganglia), and occurring in many peripheral tissues and cells and in carcinoid tumors.
[sero- + G. tonos, tone, tension, + -in]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

serotonin

(sĕr′ə-tō′nĭn, sîr′-)
n.
An organic compound, C10H12N2O, that is formed from tryptophan and is found especially in the gastrointestinal tract, the platelets, and the nervous system of humans and other animals, and functions as a neurotransmitter and in vasoconstriction, stimulation of the smooth muscles, and regulation of cyclic body processes.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ser·o·to·nin

(ser'ŏ-tō'nin)
A vasoconstrictor, liberated by platelets; inhibits gastric secretion and stimulates smooth muscle; also acts as a neurotransmitter; present in the central nervous system, many peripheral tissues and cells, and carcinoid tumors.
Synonym(s): 5-hydroxytryptamine.
[L. serum + G. tonos, tone, tension, + -in]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

serotonin

5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). A NEUROTRANSMITTER and HORMONE found in many tissues, especially the brain, the intestinal lining and the blood platelets. Serotonin is concerned in controlling mood and levels of consciousness. Its action is disturbed by some hallucinogenic drugs and imitated by others. It constricts small blood vessels, cuts down acid secretion by the stomach and contracts the muscles in the wall of the intestine.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

serotonin

a pharmacologically active compound, derived from tryptophan, which acts as a vasodilator, increases capillary permeability, and causes contraction of smooth muscle.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Serotonin

A chemical produced by the brain that functions as a neurotransmitter. Low serotonin levels are associated with mood disorders, particularly depression. Medications known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are used to treat BDD and other disorders characterized by depressed mood.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ser·o·to·nin

(ser'ŏ-tō'nin)
A vasoconstrictor, liberated by platelets; inhibits gastric secretion and stimulates smooth muscle; also acts as a neurotransmitter; present in the central nervous system, many peripheral tissues and cells, and carcinoid tumors.
Synonym(s): 5-hydroxytryptamine.
[L. serum + G. tonos, tone, tension, + -in]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
"Serotonin, a hormone that transmits signals between nerve cells in the brain, is known to regulate breathing and waking from sleep, but what is unknown is how it may influence breathing before, during and after seizures," study author Dr.
The amount of serotonergic activity most likely to cause serotonin syndrome is unclear.
Four cases met both the Sternbach and Hunter diagnostic criteria for serotonin syndrome, but in only two of these cases had triptans been used at around the time that the serotonin syndrome developed.
The study also found that a treatment that raises serotonin in the gut and the brain may alleviate both conditions.
In ECT group, for measuring plasma serotonin level, 5 ml blood sample were taken immediately before ECT, 15 minutes, 2, 6, and 24 hours, 16 and 30 days after the first ECT.
A potentially life threatening condition known as serotonin syndrome poses a potential risk to patients admitted to a burns unit, the diagnosis of which can potentially be masked by symptoms commonly seen in burns patients.
Crucially, sometimes serotonin release in the brain was temporarily boosted in mice with genetically modified serotonin neurons by a technique called optogenetics, allowing the effects of serotonin on learning to be assessed.
In 17 patients, serotonin syndrome was suspected; only two patients were classified as having definite serotonin syndrome (incidence rate, 0.6 cases per 10,000 person-years of exposure).
Serotonin syndrome is a potentially life threatening condition associated with increased serotonergic activity in the central nervous system (CNS).
Serotonin is a metabolite of tryptophan, an essential amino acid acquired from the diet.
Most of these anti-depressants facilitate increased access of serotonin to nerve cells; serotonin is a neurotransmitter that helps the brain regulate certain emotions.