serial

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serial

(sē′rē-ăl) [L. series, row, chain]
In numerical order, in continuity, or in sequence, as in a series.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the lateral level, the 'law of the mother' applies to seriality: 'one is a child in the same position as one's siblings in regards to one's parent or parents, but one is also different: there is room for two, three, four or more' (Mitchell, 2003, p.
Because seriality can also be a show of power (think: army), can it perhaps pivot from objectification into empowerment for women?
The subsequent sections of this essay draw out the implications of this "crossing." First, in response to the causality associated with the novelistic narrative progress, Modern Love's seriality attenuates progress by foregrounding contingent relationships, (3) both between sonnets, formally, and between husband and wife, thematically.
Biologist Paul Kammerer, in his book 'The Law of Seriality,' gave the following example among so many he collected for over 20 years:
Both books emphasize the pervasiveness of the zombie in contemporary culture, its seriality (witnessed in the serialization of TV-show, video games and films), and its adaptability (as per remediation of original to new forms).
Small-format photographs and books by Brotherus and Huning draw in the viewer in an altogether different manner, their small seriality underscoring the ongoing nature of the discourse between grief and acceptance.
(3) My suggestion is that the journal's relations with radio inflected, complicated, and altered many of the aspects of the "dynamic of seriality" James Mussell describes as at work in the periodical ("Of the Making" 72).
Discussing the adapted context of American serials exhibited in France, Canjels insists that "one of the special and important qualities of seriality is its capacity to appear in several forms ...
This paper uses Deleuzian philosophy to address the theme of repetition and seriality in Fight Club (both Chuck Palahniuk's novel and David Fincher's film) (1) and to exemplify a theory of reading that can be considered a style hospitable to youth cultures.
They had to offer viewers a new mode of identification with their series, indeed with their very seriality. Friday the 13th 3D was the most successful in this regard (it spawned another nine sequels) because it encourages its spectator to identify with herself as the enduring subject of the franchise.
It is important to note that the version of seriality shown here, where there is a sequence of decision points, is the traditional version of seriality.