serial

(redirected from Serial fiction)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

serial

[sir′ē·əl]
Etymology: L, series, row
pertaining to a succession, arrangement, or order of items.

serial

(sē′rē-ăl) [L. series, row, chain]
In numerical order, in continuity, or in sequence, as in a series.

serial

part of a series.

serial homology
see serial homology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whether moving westward into lawless northern territories or flying over the Atlantic to impose the order of Allied democracy, Renfrew's serial adventures are narrative versions of British imperialism's serial expansion; the protagonist's desire to control and contain unruly bodies and undefined borders is a proxy for the serial fiction market's desire to never cease organizing adventure into narratives that accumulate into a world that imagines a totality built on expansion and repetition.
The stuff of serial fiction becomes, to borrow the title of Dickens's periodical in which so many Victorian novels made their first appearance, "household words"--famous but also familiar.
But I want to suggest that there was more to Pater's decision to attempt the untried form (for him) of publishing serial fiction in 1888 when Gaston appeared.
It was Steele's creation, he argues, and within its first six months he introduced the journalistic features which made it and its successor, the Spectator, distinctive: serial fiction, letters to the editor, theatrical criticism, poetry, the persona of Isaac Bickerstaff (the name borrowed from Swift), and the extended informal essay.
In 1889 he moved to London, working as a clerk, and soon began writing popular serial fiction and editing a women's magazine.
Serial fiction appeared for the first time, by Henry James, Howells, and Joseph Conrad.
Story Worldwide, serving more than 15 major global and regional clients through its offices in London, New York and Seattle, has a core skill set involving all aspects of storytelling, from journalism to serial fiction.
But he also achieves this tighter ironisation of romance by bringing into play his responses to a new form of serial fiction in which he now aimed to present his work.
Does Collins's serial fiction, drawing as it does on the 19th-century's popular romantic novels, attain a novelistic "firstness" not only for its publication date but also for an apparent lack of autobiographical material?