Septicemia


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septicemia

 [sep″tĭ-se´me-ah]
the presence of infective agents or their toxins in the bloodstream, popularly known as blood poisoning. It is characterized by elevated body temperature, chills, and weakness. Small abscesses may form on the surface of the body and red and blue streaks become apparent along the pathway of surface blood vessels leading to and from the site of the primary infection. A blood culture confirms the diagnosis and helps identify the most effective antiinfective drug for therapy. This is a serious condition that must be treated promptly; otherwise the process of infection leads to circulatory collapse, profound shock, and death. adj., adj septice´mic.
cryptogenic septicemia septicemia in which the focus of infection is not evident during life.
puerperal septicemia puerperal fever.

sep·ti·ce·mi·a

(sep'ti-sē'mē-ă),
Systemic disease caused by the spread of microorganisms and their toxins through circulating blood; formerly called "blood poisoning."
See also: pyemia, bacteremia.
[G. sēpsis, putrefaction, + haima, blood]

septicemia

(sĕp′tĭ-sē′mē-ə)
n.
Systemic infection of the blood by pathogenic microorganisms, especially bacteria, that originate from a localized source. Also called blood poisoning.

sep′ti·ce′mic (-mĭk) adj.

septicemia

Infectious disease A rapidly progressive, life-threatening infection characterized by bacteremia which may be 2º to local infection of respiratory, GI, or GU tracts, associated with osteomyelitis, meningitis, or infection of other tissues; it may rapidly lead to septic shock, death Clinical Onset heralded by spiking fever, chills, tachypnea, tachycardia, toxic appearance, sense of impending doom; Sx rapidly progress to shock–hypothermia, hypotension, changed mental status, clotting defects–eg, petechiae, ecchymosis; if caused by N meningococcus, shock, adrenal collapse, DIC. See Sepsis syndrome.

sep·ti·ce·mi·a

(sep'ti-sē'mē-ă )
A systemic disease caused by multiplication of microorganisms in circulating blood; formerly called "blood poisoning."
See also: pyemia
Synonym(s): septic fever, septicaemia.
[G. sēpsis, putrefaction, + haima, blood]

Septicemia

The medical term for blood poisoning, in which bacteria have invaded the bloodstream and circulates throughout the body.

sep·ti·ce·mi·a

(sep'ti-sē'mē-ă)
Systemic disease caused by the spread of microorganisms and their toxins through circulating blood; formerly called "blood poisoning."
[G. sēpsis, putrefaction, + haima, blood]
References in periodicals archive ?
and Bhattacharya, C., Outbreak of hemorrhagic septicemia in free range buffalo and cattle grazing at riverside grassland in Murshidabad District, West Bengal, India.
A 67% cases with nosocomial septicemia were discharged while mortality was reported in 25% cases.
Hemorrhagic septicemia (HS) is an acute and often fatal disease primarily occurring in water buffaloes and cattle, but occasionally other domesticated and wild mammals (De Alwis, 1992).
Chronic liver disease and consumption of raw oysters: a potentially lethal combination--a review of Vibrio vulnificus septicemia. Am J Gastroenterol.
From 1979 through 1987, septicemia discharges totaled 2,570,000.
Development of ELISA Techniques for Hemorrhagic Septicemia. Int'l J.
Inclusion Criteria: Neonates admitted with the clinical diagnosis of neonatal septicemia were included in the study as per the criteria by Vergnono et al (6) i-e on the basis of H/O maternal fever, H/O prolonged labour, Birth asphyxia, convulsions, symptoms of respiratory distress, temperature >37.7[degrees]C or <35.5[degrees]C, refusal of feeds, lethargy.
Jaundice is also an important manifestation of septicemia and urinary tract infection (UTI) and should be seriously considered when it first appears after the age of 3 days and is persistent beyond two weeks of life.
News reports said on earlier this week that an Iranian man who had been seeking asylum in Australia, but developed septicemia after a cut on his foot at an offshore detention center, died on Saturday.
violaceum septicemia, with 2 fatalities, in siblings after recreational exposure in northeastern Brazil.
Coli along with CONS and Pseudomonas are the main organisms responsible for neonatal septicemia in India.
Two cases of community-acquired septicemia caused by serotype-O1 Yersinia pseudotuberculosis were diagnosed in middle-aged, HIV-positive, immunodeficient patients during an 8-month period.