Septal hematoma

Septal hematoma

A mass of extravasated blood that is confined within the nasal septum.
Mentioned in: Nasal Trauma
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References in periodicals archive ?
Septal hematoma is managed emergently because blood has accumulated between the nose cartilage and perichondrium.
Aggressive nasal surgeries like submucosal resection (SMR) for nasal obstruction, untreated septal pathologies like septal hematoma, abscess and chronic granulomatous diseases are further sources of insult to nose.
When the correlation between positive clinical and radiologic findings was analyzed, crepitation was correlated with radiologic data in 155/156 (99.3%) cases, deviation of nasal axis in 135/142 (95%), septal hematoma 4/5 (80%), swelling in 103/134 (76.8%), laceration in 60/93 (64.5%), and epistaxis in 7/14 (50%).
In this report, we would like to present a case of interventricular septal hematoma after retrograde intervention for a chronic total occlusion and the chronological change of echocardiographic and magnetic resonance imaging.
Nasal packs are placed following nasal surgery to arrest hemorrhage, to prevent septal hematoma, septal abscess formation and internal stabilization following operations on the cartilaginous/bony skeleton of the nose.
The most frequent etiology symptom sign and complication was road traffic accident in 65 (54.15%) epistaxis in 85 (70.80%) external nasal deformity in 92 (76.65%) and septal hematoma in 24 (20%) cases respectively.
(3) Other possible complications include; septal hematoma, aesthetic complications like disfigurement of the nose, and saddling of the nasal bridge; besides these patients are liable to suffer from lifelong functional problems like vestibular stenosis- a possible stenosis of the external and internal nasal valves.
An otolaryngologist/facial plastic surgeon will examine the nose to determine if there is a clot or collection of blood beneath the mucus membrane of the septum (a septal hematoma) or any fracture.
No septal hematoma was observed with either of the two types of tampon used.
The traditional rationale for routine nasal packing following septal surgery is that it results in good flap apposition and minimizes the risks of postoperative bleeding, septal hematoma, and adhesion formation.
Nasal packing is beneficial following nasal surgeries as it prevents bleeding and provides support to nasal skeleton while keeping nasal flaps together preventing septal hematoma formation.
A diagnosis of nasal septal hematoma and abscess was made, and the patient was taken urgently to the operating room for surgery.