Sepia

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Related to Sepia officinalis: Ignatia amara

Sepia

Homeopathy
A homeopathic remedy formulated from the cuttlefish, a soft mollusk native to the Mediterranean Sea; it is used primarily for female disorders, such as premenstrual syndrome, physical and emotional changes during pregnancy, prolapsed uterus and pain with sexual intercourse. Sepia is also used for abdominal bloating, violent coughing, fatty food-related indigestion, genital herpes, hair loss, headaches, itching, increased sweating, “liver spots” on skin, low back pain, motion sickness, sinusitis, varicose veins and vertigo.

SEPIA

Computer software in the UK used to maintain data about care performance.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Food imprinting: new evidence from the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis. Biol.
Polymorphic microsatellites in the common cuttlefish Sepia officinalis (Cephalopoda).
Aspects of the stock dynamics and exploitation of cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis (Linnaeus, 1758), in the English Channel.
Los glucidos del musculo (29%) de Octopus mimus, contribuyeron en gran parte al sostenimiento de la reproduccion, contrastando con la poca importancia y bajo porcentaje (0,56%) que tiene en Sepia officinalis (Storey & Storey, 1983).
(1988) obtained a hemocyanin concentration from 58.4 to 88.9 g/L in Sepia officinalis and 47.6-66.9 g/L in Octopus vulgaris from the copper content.
Biokinetics of zinc and cadmium accumulation and depuration at different stages in the life cycle of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis. Mar.
Histochemical localization of cholinesterases and monoamines in the central heart of Sepia officinalis L.
Cephalopod and chiton (Octopus dofleini, Sepia officinalis and Lepidochiton sp.) hemocyanins are organized as decamers, consisting of ten identical subunits, with a molecular mass of 350 or 400 kDa and folded into seven or eight functional units with molecular mass of about 50 kDa (Herskovits and Hamilton, 1991; Van Holde et al., 1992; Markl et al., 2001).
(1989) for 2-3-too-old juvenile Sepia officinalis at 21.5[degrees]C (3.9% body weight/day).