sepal

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Related to Sepals: stamens, Carpels

sepal

a modified leaf (usually green) forming part of the CALYX of the flower of a DICOTYLEDON, which often protects the flower while in bud but which can be modified for other functions; for example in the dandelion it forms the seed parachute.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sepals triangular-lanceolate, sparsely pubescent above and adaxially tomentose, margin initially glandular, denticulate, apex acuminate.
The process of flower opening in wild Passiflora setacea was characterized by the expansion of the floral bud caused by the pressure exerted by stigmas and anthers on walls formed by the arrangement of petals and sepals, the latter welded together, which makes flower opening in a smooth way difficult, so opening occurs instantaneously.
Briefly, fresh dried petals and sepals form rose flowers were randomly selected and divided in 3 groups then washed and dried (drying of samples were carried out under shade).
Indumentum tomentulose constituted of trichomes tector 0.3-0.5 mm long, dense to sparse, pale, rufous, distributed on the branches, stipules, petioles, rachis, abaxial face of the leaflets, ribs, bracts, pedicels, sepals, ovary and fruit.
Bud length and width: length and width of 10 flower buds were measured using a venire caliper and average measurement was taken; diameter of corolla: average diameter of 10 freshly bloomed flowers was taken; number of petals and sepals: petals and sepals of 10 freshly bloomed flowers were counted manually; petal length and width: length and width of petals were measured using a venire caliper; three pistil traits, namely, style length, style column length, and style arm length, were measured using a Vernier caliper.
The beetles attacked passion fruit flowers and lodged themselves in the sepals, petal, and corona, and perforated the sepals and ovary.
It is obtained from fresh rose blossom comprising the petals and sepals of roses of the species Rosa damascena Mill., with shoots, leaves and buds removed, and without any mechanical impurities (e.g.