sentience

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sentience

(sĕn′shəns, -shē-əns, -tē-əns)
n.
1. The quality or state of being sentient; consciousness.
2. Feeling as distinguished from perception or thought.
References in periodicals archive ?
The consequentialist theories that I want to put forward as models of Mahayana ethics are universalist: they take into account consequences for all sentient beings over the entire future history of the universe.
The wish to see all sentient beings free from suffering and its causes lays the foundation of compassion.
Looking at the first sentence, we read: "All sentient beings without exception have the Buddha-nature." Sentient beings (Skt.
By identifying the Buddha with the mind and one's original nature, Chinul joins many other Zen masters to whom the identity between the Buddha and sentient beings in their original state marks the basic promise of the school.
One can still maintain, with most contemporary biocentrists and animal ethicists, that there are gradations of non-anthropogenic value--that, for example, sentient beings generally have more of it than non-sentient beings and that some sentient beings have more of it than others (Nolt, 2013, 2015: 178-80).
Perhaps the natural tendency for a religious thinker who believes salvific efficacy to be all-pervasive is to resolve this tension by concluding that all sentient beings will attain salvation.
* The placing of a sentient being inside a torture machine such as an "Iron Maiden" (NOTE: The discovery of a body, poked full of holes, inside a torture machine is not Gratuitous Violence)
Under current EU law, animals are recognised as sentient beings, acknowledging their ability to feel pain, to suffer and to experience joy.
It teaches them that animals are mere props and decorations, rather than sentient beings deserving of respect.
In "Zima," the Twelve Astrological signs in the form of living, breathing sentient beings; humans on an insightful and decisive quest.
But we are the only animals that are able to dedicate the cognitive space to ponder our relationship to a wider world, and think about what it means to eat other sentient beings (and make choices to alter our diet to settle our troubled consciences).
In my experience, horses are very sentient beings. I'll never forget the one year that my wife and I lived adjacent to a corral where two horses lived: a male and a female, companions of each other.