transduction

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transduction

 [trans-duk´shun]
the transfer of a genetic fragment from one microorganism to another by bacteriophage.

trans·duc·tion

(tranz-dŭk'shŭn),
1. Transfer of genetic material (and its phenotypic expression) from one cell to another by viral infection.
2. A form of genetic recombination in bacteria.
3. Conversion of energy from one form to another.
[trans- + L. duco, pp. ductus, to lead across]

transduction

/trans·duc·tion/ (-duk´shun)
1. a method of genetic recombination in bacteria, in which DNA is transferred between bacteria via bacteriophages.
2. the transforming of one form of energy into another, as by the sensory mechanisms of the body.

sensory transduction  the process by which a sensory receptor converts a stimulus from the environment to an action potential for transmission to the brain.

transduction

(trăns-dŭk′shən, trănz-)
n.
2. The transfer of genetic material from one cell to another, especially a bacterial cell, through the use of a bacteriophage.

trans·duc′tion·al adj.

transduction

[-duk′shən]
a method of genetic recombination by which DNA is transferred from one cell to another by a viral vector. Various bacteriophages transfer DNA from one species of bacteria to another.

trans·duc·tion

(trans-dŭk'shŭn)
1. Transfer of genetic material (and its phenotypic expression) from one cell to another by viral infection.
2. A form of genetic recombination in bacteria.
3. Conversion of energy from one form to another.
[trans- + L. duco, pp. ductus, to lead across]

transduction

1. The conversion of energy in one form into energy in another.
2. The transfer of a gene from one bacterial host to another by means of a phage.
3. The transfer of a gene from one cell host to another by a retrovirus.

transduction

  1. the transfer of DNA from one bacterium to another, using a VIRUS as a vector. The donor is subjected to LYSIS, the recipient is infected with a transducing phage. See GENERALIZED TRANSDUCTION, SPECIALIZED TRANSDUCTION.
  2. the process of relaying a signal (e.g. a hormone) to an effector system to stimulate the appropriate cellular response.
  3. a process involved in conversion of one form of energy (e.g. light) into another (e.g. chemical).

transduction 

Generally, the conversion of one form of energy into another. Example: the transformation of light energy into receptor potentials in the photoreceptors of the retina (also called phototransduction). The absorption of light by the pigments of the photoreceptors triggers a cascade of biochemical events that leads to a change in ionic fluxes across the plasma membrane and to a change in resting potential from around −40 mV in the dark, to around −70 mV in light, that is a hyperpolarization of the cells. See depolarization; hyperpolarization; receptor potential; visual pigment.

transduction

the transfer of a genetic fragment from one bacterium to another by bacteriophage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Later chapters cover cell injury and inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases, sensory transduction, and neural processing/behavior.
PART VII: Sensory Transduction Molecular Biology of Vision Molecular Biology of Olfaction and Taste Molecular Biology of Hearing and Balance Pain
They play an important role in a wide variety of biological processes such as nerve and muscle excitation, hormone secretion, learning and memory, cell proliferation, sensory transduction, the control of salt and water balance and blood pressure regulation.