sensory integration dysfunction

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sensory integration dysfunction

n.
A neurological disorder characterized by disruption in the processing and organization of sensory information by the central nervous system, characterized by impaired sensitivity to sensory input, motor control problems, unusually high or low activity levels, and emotional instability.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sensory seeking behaviour improved in 5 EG and 2 CG infants.
Most infants in both groups fell within the typical performance range for sensory seeking behaviour, corresponding to a developmental trend of infants and toddlers aged 7-36 months.
The results showed significant differences between the groups on 8 out of 10 factors on the SP, including Sensory Seeking, Emotionally Reactive, Low Endurance/Tone, Oral Sensitivity, Inattention/Distractibility, Poor Registration, Fine Motor/Perceptual, and Other.
The factors of the SP that showed the highest reported Definite Differences in the ASD group were Sensory Seeking (60%), Emotionally Reactive (57%), Inattention/Distractibility (56%), Fine Motor/Perceptual (52%) and Oral Sensory Sensitivity (40%).
Sensory seeking has not been proposed for the DSM-V classification system, but describes children who tend to crave intense or an unusual amount of sensory input.
Josh is sensory seeking and has difficulty using various types of materials, such as crayons, street chalk, and markers.
Swinging is a source of whole-body proprioceptive input for sensory-seeking individuals, and for those without intensified sensory seeking behaviors, the calming benefits are just as great.
Sensory seeking behaviors are common in children with ASD.