perception

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perception

 [per-sep´shun]
the conscious mental registration of a sensory stimulus. adj., adj percep´tive.
depth perception the ability to recognize depth or the relative distances to different objects in space.
disturbed sensory perception a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a change in the amount of patterning of incoming stimuli, accompanied by a diminished, exaggerated, distorted, or impaired response to such stimuli.
extrasensory perception (ESP) knowledge of, or response to, an external thought or objective event not achieved as the result of stimulation of the sense organs.

per·cep·tion

(per-sep'shŭn),
The mental process of becoming aware of or recognizing an object or idea; primarily cognitive rather than affective or conative, although all three aspects are manifested.
Synonym(s): esthesia (1)

perception

Paranormal
See Extrasensory perception.
 
Psychology
The constellation of mental processes by which a person recognises, organises and interprets intellectual, sensory and emotional data in a logical or meaningful fashion.

perception

Psychology Mental processes by which intellectual, sensory, and emotional data are organized logically or meaningfully

per·cep·tion

(pĕr-sep'shŭn)
The mental process of becoming aware of or recognizing an object or idea; primarily cognitive rather than affective or conative, although all three aspects are manifested.
Synonym(s): esthesia.

perception

The reception, selection, organization and interpretation of sensory data. Perception is greatly influenced by previous experience and the stored data accumulated from such experience.

perception 

The mental process of recognizing and interpreting an object through one or more of the senses stimulated by a physical object. Thus one recognizes the shape, colour, location and differentiation of an object from its background. See sensation; visual integration.
anorthoscopic perception See anorthoscope.
binocular perception Perception obtained through simultaneous use of both eyes.
contour perception See contour.
depth perception Perception of the distance of an object from the observer (absolute distance) or of the distance between two objects (relative distance). Our ability to judge the latter is much more precise than for the former. Many factors contribute to depth perception. Most important is the existence on the two retinae of different images of the same object (called binocular disparity or retinal disparity). There are also many other contributing factors, such as the characteristics of the stimulus (called cues), binocular parallax and, to a smaller extent, the muscular proprioceptive information due to the efforts of accommodation and convergence. Depth perception is more precise in binocular vision but is possible in monocular vision using the following cues: interposition (superposition), relative position, relative size, linear perspective, textural gradient, aerial perspective, light and shade, shadow and motion parallax (Fig. P6). Syn. spatial vision. See stereoscopic visual acuity; visual binocular cliff cell; moon illusion; aerial perspective; linear perspective; relief; Ames room; leaf room; stereopsis.
dermo-optical perception See extrasensory perception.
extrasensory perception Perception obtained by means other than through the ordinary senses as, for example, telepathy (mind reading) or reading by moving a finger over a printed text (dermo-optical perception).
light p . (LP) Term used to indicate a barely seeing eye that can just see light but not the form of objects. Loss of light perception represents blindness.
subliminal perception Stimuli below the threshold of sensation (i.e. subliminal) may, in rare circumstances (e.g. exposure of 40 ms duration masked by another stimulus), unconsciously arouse perception. The effect is then of extremely short duration (less than 200 ms).
visual perception Perception obtained through the sense of vision.
Fig. P6 Examples of monocular cues to depth perception; A, relative size; B, interposition and relative sizeenlarge picture
Fig. P6 Examples of monocular cues to depth perception; A, relative size; B, interposition and relative size

per·cep·tion

(pĕr-sep'shŭn)
The mental process of becoming aware of or recognizing an object or idea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Every variable represents a factor in multimodal sensory perception. We have operationalized multimodal sensory interaction to mathematics, where each variable is dependent upon the other for emergence of behavior (cognitive and physical).
These, and the other essays included in Sensory Perception in the Medieval West, attempt to explore many complex aspects of sensory perception and their implications for further inquiry.
Because body maps are learned, they can be mislearned due to inappropriate models, faulty information, poor habits, or faulty sensory perceptions. Furthermore, as we age and our bodies inevitably change, the body maps must change as well.
The fundamental role of sensory perception in the constitution of psychological states is deeply troubling in the face of another medieval commonplace: the unreliability of the senses.
This ascent begins with the sensory perception of physical, temporal objects in the external world, which contain traces of the divine, moving on to the consciousness of what is within ourselves, with the mind as the image of God, to finally transcend ourselves toward the eternal (1,2).
Since it is not easy to distinguish sensation and perception, the author proposes using a united term 'sensory perception' to describe subjective responses to materials.
The book explains the physics and technology of biological functions in general, from cell structure through sensory perception and body systems, then explains the physics of imaging and other diagnostic methods, providing background on motion mechanics and liquid and gas dynamics, and discussion of the electrical engineering aspects of medical device design and electrical events in biology.
The German competition put the robot through its paces in a simulated disaster environment which required robots to demonstrate their capabilities in mobility, sensory perception, planning, mapping, and operator interfaces, while searching for simulated victims in difficult environments.
With no sensory perception in his hips and legs, he could not feel the seat temperature rise to about 155[degrees].
A blind lawyer with unique radar-like sensory perception takes to the street to battle the evil he cannot fight in the courtroom.
"The ultimate aim is to create machines that can capture information through sensory perception, process it in a way similar to the brain, and then act intelligently on that information," McGinnity said.
A sensory perception package for identification and avoidance of fixed and moving obstacles comprises the heart of this vehicle.